Intimate Obscurity: American Indian Women in Arizona Households and Histories, 1854-1935

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204066
Title:
Intimate Obscurity: American Indian Women in Arizona Households and Histories, 1854-1935
Author:
Jagodinsky, Katrina
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 4/8/2012
Abstract:
In three microhistories, this narrative reconstructs Indian women's engagement with imperial regimes and raises questions about power and agency in a territorial borderland. Exhaustive research in archives not previously considered valuable sources of Native history yielded census data, legal transcripts, and probate records that revealed Native women's participation in the formation of Arizona's legal culture--an overlapping network of federal, state, and tribal jurisdictions that fostered racial ambiguity and cloaked inter-racial intimacy. One of the strengths of this work is that it is based in sources few others have bothered to consider closely.Heavily steeped in the work of third-world and critical legal scholars who see the exploitation of Indigenous women's bodies as a fundamental component of American conquest, Intimate Obscurity puts Native women at the center of Arizona and borderlands historiography. Obscured by chroniclers who continue to celebrate the region's pioneer past, and yet intimately tied to the territory's founding fathers, the women in this study are exceptional because they made their cases known in unsympathetic courts and exemplary because they shared the same economic and sexual vulnerabilities that Native women continue to face today.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichols, Roger

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIntimate Obscurity: American Indian Women in Arizona Households and Histories, 1854-1935en_US
dc.creatorJagodinsky, Katrinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJagodinsky, Katrinaen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 4/8/2012en_US
dc.description.abstractIn three microhistories, this narrative reconstructs Indian women's engagement with imperial regimes and raises questions about power and agency in a territorial borderland. Exhaustive research in archives not previously considered valuable sources of Native history yielded census data, legal transcripts, and probate records that revealed Native women's participation in the formation of Arizona's legal culture--an overlapping network of federal, state, and tribal jurisdictions that fostered racial ambiguity and cloaked inter-racial intimacy. One of the strengths of this work is that it is based in sources few others have bothered to consider closely.Heavily steeped in the work of third-world and critical legal scholars who see the exploitation of Indigenous women's bodies as a fundamental component of American conquest, Intimate Obscurity puts Native women at the center of Arizona and borderlands historiography. Obscured by chroniclers who continue to celebrate the region's pioneer past, and yet intimately tied to the territory's founding fathers, the women in this study are exceptional because they made their cases known in unsympathetic courts and exemplary because they shared the same economic and sexual vulnerabilities that Native women continue to face today.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichols, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFew, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLomawaima, Tsianinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrissey, Katherineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11447-
dc.identifier.oclc752261317-
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