Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203768
Title:
Gypsum Application on Wheat at Coolidge, 1987
Author:
Ottman, Mike; Stroehlein, Jack; Christian, Tom
Issue Date:
Sep-1987
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Forage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Gypsum is applied to alleviate the problems associated with sodium- affected soils, such as surface crusting and impeded water infiltration. Due to the uncertainties in identifying gypsum-responsive sites, field studies were initiated to further our understanding of conditions responsible for the response of wheat to gypsum applications. Gypsum was applied at rates ranging from 0 to 4 T/A on two commercial farms near Coolidge, AZ. No differences in wheat grain yield, grain protein, stand, grain bushel weight, or plant height were detected at the 5% probability level at either site with the exception of increased plant height at one site. The positive benefits of gypsum have been documented in the past with certain soils; this study is just one of many required to more positively define gypsum-responsive sites in Arizona. The economics of gypsum application involves delivery and application cost of gypsum and the change in yield and value of subsequent crops.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Grain -- Arizona; Forage plants -- Arizona; Barley -- Arizona; Oats -- Arizona; Wheat -- Arizona; Barley -- Soils; Oats -- Soils; Wheat -- Soils; Barley -- Water; Oats -- Water; Wheat -- Water
Series/Report no.:
370071; Series P-71

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleGypsum Application on Wheat at Coolidge, 1987en_US
dc.contributor.authorOttman, Mikeen_US
dc.contributor.authorStroehlein, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorChristian, Tomen_US
dc.date.issued1987-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalForage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractGypsum is applied to alleviate the problems associated with sodium- affected soils, such as surface crusting and impeded water infiltration. Due to the uncertainties in identifying gypsum-responsive sites, field studies were initiated to further our understanding of conditions responsible for the response of wheat to gypsum applications. Gypsum was applied at rates ranging from 0 to 4 T/A on two commercial farms near Coolidge, AZ. No differences in wheat grain yield, grain protein, stand, grain bushel weight, or plant height were detected at the 5% probability level at either site with the exception of increased plant height at one site. The positive benefits of gypsum have been documented in the past with certain soils; this study is just one of many required to more positively define gypsum-responsive sites in Arizona. The economics of gypsum application involves delivery and application cost of gypsum and the change in yield and value of subsequent crops.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectGrain -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectForage plants -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectOats -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Soilsen_US
dc.subjectOats -- Soilsen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Soilsen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Wateren_US
dc.subjectOats -- Wateren_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Wateren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/203768-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370071en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-71en_US
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