Nanoscale Feature Composite: An Ensemble Surface for Enhancing Cardiovascular Implant Endothelialization

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203530
Title:
Nanoscale Feature Composite: An Ensemble Surface for Enhancing Cardiovascular Implant Endothelialization
Author:
Tran, Phat L.
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The establishment and maintenance of functional endothelial cells (ECs) on an engineered surface is central to tissue engineering. As the field advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, particularly the adhesive interaction between the surface of implantable devices and biological systems, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. Knowledge of these interactions can address many fundamental biological questions and would provide key design parameters for medical implants. It has been shown that EC functionality and adhesivity, crucial for the re-endothelialization process, can be induced by nanotopographical modification. Therefore, the goal of this dissertation research was to develop an ensemble surface composing of nanoscale features for the enhancement of endothelial cell adhesion. Without adhesion, subsequent vital mechanism involved in cell alignment, elongation or spreading, proliferation, migration, and ECM proteins deposition will not occur.Experiments in support of this goal were broken down into three specific aims. The first aim was to characterize and develop a size-dependent self-assembly (SDSA) nanoarray of Octamer transcription factor 4 as a demonstration to the fabrication of nanoscale feature surface. This nanoparticle array platform was a pilot studied for the second aim, which was the development of an ensemble surface of nanoscale features for endothelial cell adhesion. The third aim was to evaluate and assess EC response to the ensemble surface.Hence, we developed an ensemble surface composed of nanoscale features and adhesive elements for EC adhesivity. By using shear stress as a detachment force, we demonstrated greater cell retention by the ensemble surface than uniform controls. Adhesive interactions and cellular migration through integrin expressions, which are critical to tissue development and wound healing process was also observed. Furthermore, cell viability was relatively sustainable, as indicated by the low expression of apoptotic signaling molecules. The findings presented within this dissertation research can be applicable to blood-contact medical implants and possess the potential for future clinical translation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
ensemble surface; nanoscale textured; Biomedical Engineering; endothelial cell; endothelialization
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biomedical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNanoscale Feature Composite: An Ensemble Surface for Enhancing Cardiovascular Implant Endothelializationen_US
dc.creatorTran, Phat L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTran, Phat L.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe establishment and maintenance of functional endothelial cells (ECs) on an engineered surface is central to tissue engineering. As the field advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, particularly the adhesive interaction between the surface of implantable devices and biological systems, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. Knowledge of these interactions can address many fundamental biological questions and would provide key design parameters for medical implants. It has been shown that EC functionality and adhesivity, crucial for the re-endothelialization process, can be induced by nanotopographical modification. Therefore, the goal of this dissertation research was to develop an ensemble surface composing of nanoscale features for the enhancement of endothelial cell adhesion. Without adhesion, subsequent vital mechanism involved in cell alignment, elongation or spreading, proliferation, migration, and ECM proteins deposition will not occur.Experiments in support of this goal were broken down into three specific aims. The first aim was to characterize and develop a size-dependent self-assembly (SDSA) nanoarray of Octamer transcription factor 4 as a demonstration to the fabrication of nanoscale feature surface. This nanoparticle array platform was a pilot studied for the second aim, which was the development of an ensemble surface of nanoscale features for endothelial cell adhesion. The third aim was to evaluate and assess EC response to the ensemble surface.Hence, we developed an ensemble surface composed of nanoscale features and adhesive elements for EC adhesivity. By using shear stress as a detachment force, we demonstrated greater cell retention by the ensemble surface than uniform controls. Adhesive interactions and cellular migration through integrin expressions, which are critical to tissue development and wound healing process was also observed. Furthermore, cell viability was relatively sustainable, as indicated by the low expression of apoptotic signaling molecules. The findings presented within this dissertation research can be applicable to blood-contact medical implants and possess the potential for future clinical translation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectensemble surfaceen_US
dc.subjectnanoscale textureden_US
dc.subjectBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectendothelial cellen_US
dc.subjectendothelializationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlepian, Marvin J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Mark R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWong, Pak K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWu, Xiaoyien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
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