Detection and Monitoring of Pathogens in Animal and Human Environment by a Handheld Immunosensor and CFD Simulation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203493
Title:
Detection and Monitoring of Pathogens in Animal and Human Environment by a Handheld Immunosensor and CFD Simulation
Author:
KWON, HYUCK JIN
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research demonstrates technology for detection of pathogens and environmental monitoring using a handheld optofluidic immunosensor and CFD simulation. The current methods such as ELISA and PCR require few hours for identification which means it is unavailable for early-monitoring. The use of a near-real-time, handheld biosensor device in a real animal/human environment is the key to monitoring the spread of dangerous pathogens. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is needed to track the pathogens within an environment.This dissertation has four papers that demonstrate technologies for the detection and monitoring of pathogens and the miniaturization of these detection systems for in field applications with a handheld immunosensor and CFD simulation.In the first paper, an environmental prediction model was developed for optimal ventilation in a mushroom house by using sensible heat balance and 3-D CFD method. It is shown that the models can be used for farmers to predict the environmental conditions over different locations in a mushroom house.In the second paper, a field lab-on-a-chip system was constructed to detect mouse immunoglobulin G and Escherichia coli by using light scattering detection of particle immunoagglutination. Antibody-conjugated particles were able to be stored in a 4°C refrigerator for at least 4 weeks and to be lyophilized as a powder form for the storage in room temperature.In the third paper, rapid monitoring of the spreads of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was attempted using samples collected from nasal swabs of pigs and air samplers within an experimental swine building. An optofluidic device containing liquid-core waveguides was used to detect. It is shown that the developed optofluidic device and 3-D CFD model can serve as a good model for monitoring the spread of airborne viruses within animal and human environments.In the fourth paper, a handheld optofluidic immunosensor was developed for rapid detection of H1N1/2009 virus inside a 1:10 scale mock classroom. Both miniature spectrometer and cell phone camera were used as detector. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to track the transport/distribution of H1N1/2009 viruses, and corresponded very well with immunosensor readings.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
optofluidic lab-on-a-chip; pathogen detection; a handheld immunosensor; CFD simulation; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDetection and Monitoring of Pathogens in Animal and Human Environment by a Handheld Immunosensor and CFD Simulationen_US
dc.creatorKWON, HYUCK JINen_US
dc.contributor.authorKWON, HYUCK JINen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research demonstrates technology for detection of pathogens and environmental monitoring using a handheld optofluidic immunosensor and CFD simulation. The current methods such as ELISA and PCR require few hours for identification which means it is unavailable for early-monitoring. The use of a near-real-time, handheld biosensor device in a real animal/human environment is the key to monitoring the spread of dangerous pathogens. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is needed to track the pathogens within an environment.This dissertation has four papers that demonstrate technologies for the detection and monitoring of pathogens and the miniaturization of these detection systems for in field applications with a handheld immunosensor and CFD simulation.In the first paper, an environmental prediction model was developed for optimal ventilation in a mushroom house by using sensible heat balance and 3-D CFD method. It is shown that the models can be used for farmers to predict the environmental conditions over different locations in a mushroom house.In the second paper, a field lab-on-a-chip system was constructed to detect mouse immunoglobulin G and Escherichia coli by using light scattering detection of particle immunoagglutination. Antibody-conjugated particles were able to be stored in a 4°C refrigerator for at least 4 weeks and to be lyophilized as a powder form for the storage in room temperature.In the third paper, rapid monitoring of the spreads of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was attempted using samples collected from nasal swabs of pigs and air samplers within an experimental swine building. An optofluidic device containing liquid-core waveguides was used to detect. It is shown that the developed optofluidic device and 3-D CFD model can serve as a good model for monitoring the spread of airborne viruses within animal and human environments.In the fourth paper, a handheld optofluidic immunosensor was developed for rapid detection of H1N1/2009 virus inside a 1:10 scale mock classroom. Both miniature spectrometer and cell phone camera were used as detector. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to track the transport/distribution of H1N1/2009 viruses, and corresponded very well with immunosensor readings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectoptofluidic lab-on-a-chipen_US
dc.subjectpathogen detectionen_US
dc.subjecta handheld immunosensoren_US
dc.subjectCFD simulationen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCuello, Joel L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKacira, Muraten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGiacomelli, Gene A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
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