Population Structure of Yarrow's Spiny Lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii, and its Malarial Parasite, Plasmodium chiricahuae

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203479
Title:
Population Structure of Yarrow's Spiny Lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii, and its Malarial Parasite, Plasmodium chiricahuae
Author:
Kaplan, Matthew Ezra
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Estimates from radiocarbon-dated packrat middens indicate that the high elevation woodland communities of the Madrean Sky Islands were continuous as recently as 8,000 to 12,000 years ago. A number of population studies on a diverse collection of taxa have investigated the extent to which the Madrean Sky Island system has limited gene flow among mountain ranges. The results of several of these studies indicate that population divergences may be more ancient than the Holocene. Yarrow’s spiny lizards, Sceloporus jarrovii, were sampled from eight sites representing seven mountain ranges. The populations of S. jarrovii are host to the malarial parasite, Plasmodium chiricahuae. DNA sequences from the lizards and their malarial parasites were used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships and estimate the ages of the populations for both host and parasite. The findings of these analyses indicate that the sky island populations of S. jarrovii have been isolated for hundreds of thousands of years and did not experience gene flow during the last woodland expansion. In contrast, the results indicate that the malarial infection occurred more recently, possibly during the Holocene woodland expansion. In addition, the prevalence of the malarial infection was compared to multiple attributes of the lizards. This analysis revealed a negative relationship between the genetic diversity of the lizard populations and the prevalence of infection. Furthermore, lizard populations with lower prevalence of infection have a lower frequency of multiclonal infections.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Plasmodium chiricahuae; population genetics; Sceloporus jarrovii; sky islands; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Madrean Archipelago; phylogeography
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walsh, James B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePopulation Structure of Yarrow's Spiny Lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii, and its Malarial Parasite, Plasmodium chiricahuaeen_US
dc.creatorKaplan, Matthew Ezraen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, Matthew Ezraen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEstimates from radiocarbon-dated packrat middens indicate that the high elevation woodland communities of the Madrean Sky Islands were continuous as recently as 8,000 to 12,000 years ago. A number of population studies on a diverse collection of taxa have investigated the extent to which the Madrean Sky Island system has limited gene flow among mountain ranges. The results of several of these studies indicate that population divergences may be more ancient than the Holocene. Yarrow’s spiny lizards, Sceloporus jarrovii, were sampled from eight sites representing seven mountain ranges. The populations of S. jarrovii are host to the malarial parasite, Plasmodium chiricahuae. DNA sequences from the lizards and their malarial parasites were used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships and estimate the ages of the populations for both host and parasite. The findings of these analyses indicate that the sky island populations of S. jarrovii have been isolated for hundreds of thousands of years and did not experience gene flow during the last woodland expansion. In contrast, the results indicate that the malarial infection occurred more recently, possibly during the Holocene woodland expansion. In addition, the prevalence of the malarial infection was compared to multiple attributes of the lizards. This analysis revealed a negative relationship between the genetic diversity of the lizard populations and the prevalence of infection. Furthermore, lizard populations with lower prevalence of infection have a lower frequency of multiclonal infections.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPlasmodium chiricahuaeen_US
dc.subjectpopulation geneticsen_US
dc.subjectSceloporus jarroviien_US
dc.subjectsky islandsen_US
dc.subjectEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
dc.subjectMadrean Archipelagoen_US
dc.subjectphylogeographyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalsh, James B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanderson, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwalbe, Cecil R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhiteman, Noah K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, James B.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.