DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MULTI-RESOLUTION AND LOADING OF TRANSPORTATION ACTIVITIES (MALTA) SIMULATION BASED DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT SYSTEM, RECURSIVE ON-LINE LOAD BALANCE FRAMEWORK (ROLB)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203446
Title:
DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MULTI-RESOLUTION AND LOADING OF TRANSPORTATION ACTIVITIES (MALTA) SIMULATION BASED DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT SYSTEM, RECURSIVE ON-LINE LOAD BALANCE FRAMEWORK (ROLB)
Author:
Villalobos, Jorge Alejandro
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Multi-resolution Assignment and Loading of Transport Activities (MALTA) system is a simulation-based Dynamic Traffic Assignment model that exploits the advantages of multi-processor computing via the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. Spatially partitioned transportation networks are utilized to estimate travel time via alternate routes on mega-scale network models, while the concurrently run shortest path and assignment procedures evaluate traffic conditions and re-assign traffic in order to achieve traffic assignment goals such as User Optimal and/or System Optimal conditions.Performance gain is obtained via the spatial partitioning architecture that allows the simulation domains to distribute the work load based on a specially designed Recursive On-line Load Balance model (ROLB). The ROLB development describes how the transportation network is transformed into an ordered node network which serves as the basis for a minimum cost heuristic, solved using the shortest path, which solves a multi-objective NP Hard binary optimization problem. The approach to this problem contains a least-squares formulation that attempts to balance the computational load of each of the mSim domains as well as to minimize the inter-domain communication requirements. The model is developed from its formal formulation to the heuristic utilized to quickly solve the problem. As a component of the balancing model, a load forecasting technique is used, Fast Sim, to determine what the link loading of the future network in order to estimate average future link speeds enabling a good solution for the ROLB method.The runtime performance of the MALTA model is described in detail. It is shown how a 94% reduction in runtime was achieved with the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) network with the use of 33 CPUs. The runtime was reduced from over 60 minutes of runtime on one machine to less than 5 minutes on the 33 CPUs. The results also showed how the individual runtimes on each of the simulation domains could vary drastically with naïve partitioning methods as opposed to the balanced run-time using the ROLB method; confirming the need to have a load balancing technique for MALTA.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Partitioning; Simulation; Civil Engineering; Dynamic Traffic Assignment; Mesoscopic
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chiu, Yi-Chang

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MULTI-RESOLUTION AND LOADING OF TRANSPORTATION ACTIVITIES (MALTA) SIMULATION BASED DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT SYSTEM, RECURSIVE ON-LINE LOAD BALANCE FRAMEWORK (ROLB)en_US
dc.creatorVillalobos, Jorge Alejandroen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillalobos, Jorge Alejandroen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Multi-resolution Assignment and Loading of Transport Activities (MALTA) system is a simulation-based Dynamic Traffic Assignment model that exploits the advantages of multi-processor computing via the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol. Spatially partitioned transportation networks are utilized to estimate travel time via alternate routes on mega-scale network models, while the concurrently run shortest path and assignment procedures evaluate traffic conditions and re-assign traffic in order to achieve traffic assignment goals such as User Optimal and/or System Optimal conditions.Performance gain is obtained via the spatial partitioning architecture that allows the simulation domains to distribute the work load based on a specially designed Recursive On-line Load Balance model (ROLB). The ROLB development describes how the transportation network is transformed into an ordered node network which serves as the basis for a minimum cost heuristic, solved using the shortest path, which solves a multi-objective NP Hard binary optimization problem. The approach to this problem contains a least-squares formulation that attempts to balance the computational load of each of the mSim domains as well as to minimize the inter-domain communication requirements. The model is developed from its formal formulation to the heuristic utilized to quickly solve the problem. As a component of the balancing model, a load forecasting technique is used, Fast Sim, to determine what the link loading of the future network in order to estimate average future link speeds enabling a good solution for the ROLB method.The runtime performance of the MALTA model is described in detail. It is shown how a 94% reduction in runtime was achieved with the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) network with the use of 33 CPUs. The runtime was reduced from over 60 minutes of runtime on one machine to less than 5 minutes on the 33 CPUs. The results also showed how the individual runtimes on each of the simulation domains could vary drastically with naïve partitioning methods as opposed to the balanced run-time using the ROLB method; confirming the need to have a load balancing technique for MALTA.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPartitioningen_US
dc.subjectSimulationen_US
dc.subjectCivil Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectDynamic Traffic Assignmenten_US
dc.subjectMesoscopicen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChiu, Yi-Changen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHickman, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMirchandani, Pituen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHead, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChiu, Yi-Changen_US
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