Changing High School Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203442
Title:
Changing High School Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP)
Author:
Brooks, Eric Dwayne
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated whether participation in the Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP), a long-term authentic plant research project, in conjunction with explicit verses implicit instruction can change high school students' conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The participants included a total of 134 students comprised of three groups from 10 total classes over the course of two academic years. Participants in four classes (two each year) participated in PREP and received explicit instruction on NOS. Participants in four other classes (two each year) participated in PREP and received implicit only instruction on NOS. Additionally, two classes (one each year) of high-achieving freshmen participated in PREP and received explicit instruction on NOS. This third group was used as a comparative group to the other two groups, due to their high achievement in middle school math and science. The treatment for all three groups spanned 8 weeks and included participation in an authentic plant research project. An open-ended questionnaire (modified Views of Nature of Science - VNOS), in conjunction with semi-structured interviews, was used to assess students' conceptions before and after the intervention. Results showed that all three groups improved their conceptions of NOS equally. The high-achieving group began with significantly higher-scoring views prior to the completion of the intervention, and improved to the same degree as the other two groups. A comparison of the explicit group to the implicit only group showed that there was no significant difference in their improvement, as both groups improved equally. Implications for the teaching and learning of NOS are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Inquiry learning; Nature of Science; Plant research; Science education; Molecular & Cellular Biology; Arabidopsis thaliana; Authentic learning
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Molecular & Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tax, Frans

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChanging High School Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP)en_US
dc.creatorBrooks, Eric Dwayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Eric Dwayneen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether participation in the Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP), a long-term authentic plant research project, in conjunction with explicit verses implicit instruction can change high school students' conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The participants included a total of 134 students comprised of three groups from 10 total classes over the course of two academic years. Participants in four classes (two each year) participated in PREP and received explicit instruction on NOS. Participants in four other classes (two each year) participated in PREP and received implicit only instruction on NOS. Additionally, two classes (one each year) of high-achieving freshmen participated in PREP and received explicit instruction on NOS. This third group was used as a comparative group to the other two groups, due to their high achievement in middle school math and science. The treatment for all three groups spanned 8 weeks and included participation in an authentic plant research project. An open-ended questionnaire (modified Views of Nature of Science - VNOS), in conjunction with semi-structured interviews, was used to assess students' conceptions before and after the intervention. Results showed that all three groups improved their conceptions of NOS equally. The high-achieving group began with significantly higher-scoring views prior to the completion of the intervention, and improved to the same degree as the other two groups. A comparison of the explicit group to the implicit only group showed that there was no significant difference in their improvement, as both groups improved equally. Implications for the teaching and learning of NOS are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectInquiry learningen_US
dc.subjectNature of Scienceen_US
dc.subjectPlant researchen_US
dc.subjectScience educationen_US
dc.subjectMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
dc.subjectArabidopsis thalianaen_US
dc.subjectAuthentic learningen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular & Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTax, Fransen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTomanek, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNagy, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTax, Fransen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDolan, Erinen_US
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