A Multi-level Model Examining the Effects of Unit-level Culture on Abusive Supervision

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/203029
Title:
A Multi-level Model Examining the Effects of Unit-level Culture on Abusive Supervision
Author:
Siegel, Jessica Lynn
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines the effects of unit-level culture on abusive supervision. Utilizing Baumeister and colleagues' (2000) self-regulatory resource depletion model as an explanatory framework, I argue that aggressive unit-level culture will increase the incidence of abusive supervision, whereas people- and team-oriented unit-level cultures will decrease the incidence of abusive supervision. In line with these arguments, I then examine the degree to which those effects are mediated by ego depletion. In sum, I argue that aggressive unit-level culture will increase, while people- and team-oriented cultures will reduce, the amount of supervisor ego depletion, which then increases the incidence of abusive supervision. Using Hobfoll et al.'s (1990) Social Support Resource Theory, I further argue that the relationship between unit-level culture and ego depletion is moderated by supervisor home social support. I tested my model using a sample of 340 nurses and 52 nursing directors working in a large hospital system in the Southwestern United States. I was unable to demonstrate support for my model as hypothesized. However, I am able to contribute to the literature concerning antecedents to abusive supervision by showing that alternative conceptualization of culture impact abusive supervision. Further, I show that aggressive norms mediate the relationship between aggressive culture and abusive supervision. I also contribute to the literature examining resource depletion in the workplace by demonstrating the buffering role of supervisor home social support on ego depletion. Implications and future directions are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Self-regulation; Unit-level culture; Management; Abusive supervision; Ego depletion
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ellis, Aleksander, P. J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Multi-level Model Examining the Effects of Unit-level Culture on Abusive Supervisionen_US
dc.creatorSiegel, Jessica Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiegel, Jessica Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the effects of unit-level culture on abusive supervision. Utilizing Baumeister and colleagues' (2000) self-regulatory resource depletion model as an explanatory framework, I argue that aggressive unit-level culture will increase the incidence of abusive supervision, whereas people- and team-oriented unit-level cultures will decrease the incidence of abusive supervision. In line with these arguments, I then examine the degree to which those effects are mediated by ego depletion. In sum, I argue that aggressive unit-level culture will increase, while people- and team-oriented cultures will reduce, the amount of supervisor ego depletion, which then increases the incidence of abusive supervision. Using Hobfoll et al.'s (1990) Social Support Resource Theory, I further argue that the relationship between unit-level culture and ego depletion is moderated by supervisor home social support. I tested my model using a sample of 340 nurses and 52 nursing directors working in a large hospital system in the Southwestern United States. I was unable to demonstrate support for my model as hypothesized. However, I am able to contribute to the literature concerning antecedents to abusive supervision by showing that alternative conceptualization of culture impact abusive supervision. Further, I show that aggressive norms mediate the relationship between aggressive culture and abusive supervision. I also contribute to the literature examining resource depletion in the workplace by demonstrating the buffering role of supervisor home social support on ego depletion. Implications and future directions are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSelf-regulationen_US
dc.subjectUnit-level cultureen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectAbusive supervisionen_US
dc.subjectEgo depletionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEllis, Aleksander, P. J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Stephen W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberProvan, Keith G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEllis, Aleksander, P. J.en_US
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