RECENT EXPOSURE TO CENTERFOLD IMAGES, SEXUAL EXPLICITNESS, PAST EXPOSURE TO OBJECTIFYING MEDIA, AND THE ACTIVATION OF THE CENTERFOLD SYNDROME

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202999
Title:
RECENT EXPOSURE TO CENTERFOLD IMAGES, SEXUAL EXPLICITNESS, PAST EXPOSURE TO OBJECTIFYING MEDIA, AND THE ACTIVATION OF THE CENTERFOLD SYNDROME
Author:
Wright, Paul
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The chief goal of the present study was to test whether exposing young adult males to female centerfold images causes them to believe more strongly in a set of beliefs clinical psychologist Gary Brooks terms "the centerfold syndrome." In addition to testing the straightforward effect of exposure to centerfold images on males' centerfold syndrome beliefs, the present study explored the moderating potential of three variables: sexual explicitness of the centerfold images, males' past exposure to objectifying media, and recency of exposure to the centerfold images.Participants were randomly assigned to either a control condition that did not feature centerfold stimuli, a "nonexplicit" condition that featured female centerfolds who did not expose their nipples or genitalia, or an "explicit" condition that featured female centerfolds exposing either their nipples, genitalia, or both. Past exposure to objectifying media was assessed by asking participants how frequently they viewed pornography in the prior year. Items indexing the five centerfold syndrome beliefs - voyeurism, sexual reductionism, masculinity validation, trophyism, nonrelational sex - were administered immediately after exposure and approximately 48 hours after exposure.Exposure to centerfold images had an immediate strengthening effect on the sexual reductionism and nonrelational sex beliefs of males who view objectifying media about once a month or less and this effect persisted approximately 48 hours after exposure. Likewise, exposure to centerfold images had an immediate strengthening effect on the masculinity validation beliefs of males who view objectifying media about once a month or less, and this effect persisted at a marginally significant level approximately 48 hours after exposure. No difference were found between males exposed to nonexplicit vs. explicit images.These findings are consistent with a growing body of literature indicating that mainstream media sex can affect the sexuality of young people. Furthermore, the findings of the present study affirm the suspicions of some that objectifying depictions of females affect the sexual beliefs of some males in ways that are likely unrelated to sexual aggression but are still antisocial.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
mass media; pornography; priming; sexual socialization; Communication; centerfold syndrome; male sexuality
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kunkel, Dale

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRECENT EXPOSURE TO CENTERFOLD IMAGES, SEXUAL EXPLICITNESS, PAST EXPOSURE TO OBJECTIFYING MEDIA, AND THE ACTIVATION OF THE CENTERFOLD SYNDROMEen_US
dc.creatorWright, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Paulen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe chief goal of the present study was to test whether exposing young adult males to female centerfold images causes them to believe more strongly in a set of beliefs clinical psychologist Gary Brooks terms "the centerfold syndrome." In addition to testing the straightforward effect of exposure to centerfold images on males' centerfold syndrome beliefs, the present study explored the moderating potential of three variables: sexual explicitness of the centerfold images, males' past exposure to objectifying media, and recency of exposure to the centerfold images.Participants were randomly assigned to either a control condition that did not feature centerfold stimuli, a "nonexplicit" condition that featured female centerfolds who did not expose their nipples or genitalia, or an "explicit" condition that featured female centerfolds exposing either their nipples, genitalia, or both. Past exposure to objectifying media was assessed by asking participants how frequently they viewed pornography in the prior year. Items indexing the five centerfold syndrome beliefs - voyeurism, sexual reductionism, masculinity validation, trophyism, nonrelational sex - were administered immediately after exposure and approximately 48 hours after exposure.Exposure to centerfold images had an immediate strengthening effect on the sexual reductionism and nonrelational sex beliefs of males who view objectifying media about once a month or less and this effect persisted approximately 48 hours after exposure. Likewise, exposure to centerfold images had an immediate strengthening effect on the masculinity validation beliefs of males who view objectifying media about once a month or less, and this effect persisted at a marginally significant level approximately 48 hours after exposure. No difference were found between males exposed to nonexplicit vs. explicit images.These findings are consistent with a growing body of literature indicating that mainstream media sex can affect the sexuality of young people. Furthermore, the findings of the present study affirm the suspicions of some that objectifying depictions of females affect the sexual beliefs of some males in ways that are likely unrelated to sexual aggression but are still antisocial.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectmass mediaen_US
dc.subjectpornographyen_US
dc.subjectprimingen_US
dc.subjectsexual socializationen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectcenterfold syndromeen_US
dc.subjectmale sexualityen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKunkel, Daleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonnerstein, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMastro, Danaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKunkel, Daleen_US
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