A Feasibility Evaluation of a Digital Pen and Paper System for Accomplishing Electronic Anesthesia Record-keeping

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202988
Title:
A Feasibility Evaluation of a Digital Pen and Paper System for Accomplishing Electronic Anesthesia Record-keeping
Author:
Piotrowski, Kathleen Ann
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 2001, the Institute of Medicine stated that one of the parameters needing to be addressed to improve health care was the creation of electronic health records for all patients. This goal has proven to be very challenging to health care providers. Many barriers exist that prevent the goal of computerizing health records such as high costs, usability problems, interface incompatibility, and fear of change. The purpose of this feasibility project was to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of a digital pen and paper (DPP) system for anesthesia documentation. The specific DPP technology used in this evaluation was a product developed by Shareable Ink®. Seven certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) evaluated the DPP system through a cognitive walkthrough procedure. During the cognitive walkthrough, the participants talked aloud as they carried out a series of anesthesia documentation tasks. Just prior to the cognitive walkthrough, participants were given a questionnaire that measured their perceived computer knowledge, attitudes and skills. After the cognitive walkthrough, a second questionnaire was used to determine their satisfaction with the DPP and their opinions about its usefulness for use in multiple anesthesia work settings. In the second phase of the project, I interviewed other stakeholders in the hospital environment who would also be affected by implementation of a DPP system. This portion of the study was conducted at a community hospital without electronic record-keeping capability. Participation from several departments was sought via contact with hospital administration and department heads. Among those departments targeted for interviews were: Information Technology, Chief of Anesthesia, Anesthesia Billing, Medical Records and Nursing. Semi- structured interviews were conducted and the responses of the participants recorded both as field notes and via audio recording. This intent of this study was to test the feasibility of the digital pen and paper system for various types of anesthesia work environments by means of descriptive, survey and qualitative data analysis. Overall, the device was not only found to be usable by providers but also acceptable to stakeholders. Therefore, this device could be deemed a feasible solution toward implementing and adopting electronic documentation in some anesthesia work settings.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Digital pen; Nursing; Anesthesia; Computer
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Effken, Judith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Feasibility Evaluation of a Digital Pen and Paper System for Accomplishing Electronic Anesthesia Record-keepingen_US
dc.creatorPiotrowski, Kathleen Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorPiotrowski, Kathleen Annen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2001, the Institute of Medicine stated that one of the parameters needing to be addressed to improve health care was the creation of electronic health records for all patients. This goal has proven to be very challenging to health care providers. Many barriers exist that prevent the goal of computerizing health records such as high costs, usability problems, interface incompatibility, and fear of change. The purpose of this feasibility project was to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of a digital pen and paper (DPP) system for anesthesia documentation. The specific DPP technology used in this evaluation was a product developed by Shareable Ink®. Seven certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) evaluated the DPP system through a cognitive walkthrough procedure. During the cognitive walkthrough, the participants talked aloud as they carried out a series of anesthesia documentation tasks. Just prior to the cognitive walkthrough, participants were given a questionnaire that measured their perceived computer knowledge, attitudes and skills. After the cognitive walkthrough, a second questionnaire was used to determine their satisfaction with the DPP and their opinions about its usefulness for use in multiple anesthesia work settings. In the second phase of the project, I interviewed other stakeholders in the hospital environment who would also be affected by implementation of a DPP system. This portion of the study was conducted at a community hospital without electronic record-keeping capability. Participation from several departments was sought via contact with hospital administration and department heads. Among those departments targeted for interviews were: Information Technology, Chief of Anesthesia, Anesthesia Billing, Medical Records and Nursing. Semi- structured interviews were conducted and the responses of the participants recorded both as field notes and via audio recording. This intent of this study was to test the feasibility of the digital pen and paper system for various types of anesthesia work environments by means of descriptive, survey and qualitative data analysis. Overall, the device was not only found to be usable by providers but also acceptable to stakeholders. Therefore, this device could be deemed a feasible solution toward implementing and adopting electronic documentation in some anesthesia work settings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDigital penen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectAnesthesiaen_US
dc.subjectComputeren_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEffken, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldsmith, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLoeb, Robert G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEffken, Judith A.en_US
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