Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202933
Title:
Curing Human Misery: A Study of Seneca's Moral Philosophy
Author:
Wagoner, Robert Stephen
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I outline and argue for a new approach to Seneca's moral philosophy - with particular emphasis on the notion that human misery can only be eliminated through philosophy. I argue that a careful reading of Seneca's philosophical texts reveal that a concern for philosophical progress dominates Seneca's writing. This concern manifests itself both in what might be called practical projects in Seneca's philosophical work - including his approaches to reading, writing, teaching, and advising his audience - and in his more theoretical accounts of the nature of philosophy and its role in producing a sound mind. Seneca's concern for philosophical progress shapes his works both substantively and methodologically. This is true of his account of the nature of philosophy and the structure of philosophical discourse, his understanding of philosophical pedagogy, and his approach to reading and writing philosophical texts. The concern for progress is perhaps most pressing on the issue of the emotions. Here, too, Seneca is devoted to helping the audience in a principled, if restrained, way. I argue that Seneca's conception of philosophy as therapy is both more subtle and more successful that those accounts available from his Stoic predecessors.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Seneca; Philosophy
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Philosophy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Annas, Julia E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCuring Human Misery: A Study of Seneca's Moral Philosophyen_US
dc.creatorWagoner, Robert Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWagoner, Robert Stephenen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I outline and argue for a new approach to Seneca's moral philosophy - with particular emphasis on the notion that human misery can only be eliminated through philosophy. I argue that a careful reading of Seneca's philosophical texts reveal that a concern for philosophical progress dominates Seneca's writing. This concern manifests itself both in what might be called practical projects in Seneca's philosophical work - including his approaches to reading, writing, teaching, and advising his audience - and in his more theoretical accounts of the nature of philosophy and its role in producing a sound mind. Seneca's concern for philosophical progress shapes his works both substantively and methodologically. This is true of his account of the nature of philosophy and the structure of philosophical discourse, his understanding of philosophical pedagogy, and his approach to reading and writing philosophical texts. The concern for progress is perhaps most pressing on the issue of the emotions. Here, too, Seneca is devoted to helping the audience in a principled, if restrained, way. I argue that Seneca's conception of philosophy as therapy is both more subtle and more successful that those accounts available from his Stoic predecessors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectSenecaen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnnas, Julia E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKamtekar, Rachanaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTimmons, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnnas, Julia E.en_US
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