CLASSIFICATION AND TOPOLOGY OF HYDROGEN ENVIRONMENTS IN HYDROUS MINERALS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202771
Title:
CLASSIFICATION AND TOPOLOGY OF HYDROGEN ENVIRONMENTS IN HYDROUS MINERALS
Author:
Barkley, Madison Camille
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The inspiration for my topic was the use of hydrogen as a fuel source. Currently, the use of hydrogen is limited by the need to find a safe storage solution. I wanted to know how Nature stores hydrogen in minerals. The studies in my dissertation examine the nature of materials that contain hydrogen as OH groups through a variety of techniques. First, I examine the 450 known mineral species that contain isolated OH groups and have crystal structure determinations that include the location of the hydrogen atoms. I identify nine unique classes of OH hydrogen environments. The hydrogen environment exemplified by the mineral behoite is of particular interest because of behoite's structural relationship with SiO₂ cristobalite. I conducted two high-pressure studies exploring the similarities and differences in the behaviors of behoite and cristobalite as a function of pressure. In the process of categorizing the OH hydrogen environments in minerals I encountered minerals who's structures needed to be refined. Refinements for two minerals, despujolsite, a member of the fleischerite group of minerals, and kôzulite, an Mn rich amphibole, are presented and discussed. Two manuscripts, one on the new mineral bobdownsite, and the other on the mineral walstromite, are appended to this dissertation to highlight additional original research conducted throughout my graduate career.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Geosciences
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Downs, Robert T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCLASSIFICATION AND TOPOLOGY OF HYDROGEN ENVIRONMENTS IN HYDROUS MINERALSen_US
dc.creatorBarkley, Madison Camilleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarkley, Madison Camilleen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe inspiration for my topic was the use of hydrogen as a fuel source. Currently, the use of hydrogen is limited by the need to find a safe storage solution. I wanted to know how Nature stores hydrogen in minerals. The studies in my dissertation examine the nature of materials that contain hydrogen as OH groups through a variety of techniques. First, I examine the 450 known mineral species that contain isolated OH groups and have crystal structure determinations that include the location of the hydrogen atoms. I identify nine unique classes of OH hydrogen environments. The hydrogen environment exemplified by the mineral behoite is of particular interest because of behoite's structural relationship with SiO₂ cristobalite. I conducted two high-pressure studies exploring the similarities and differences in the behaviors of behoite and cristobalite as a function of pressure. In the process of categorizing the OH hydrogen environments in minerals I encountered minerals who's structures needed to be refined. Refinements for two minerals, despujolsite, a member of the fleischerite group of minerals, and kôzulite, an Mn rich amphibole, are presented and discussed. Two manuscripts, one on the new mineral bobdownsite, and the other on the mineral walstromite, are appended to this dissertation to highlight additional original research conducted throughout my graduate career.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDowns, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPrewitt, Charles T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDera, Przemyslawen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Roy A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDowns, Robert T.en_US
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