Hua A'aga: Basket Stories from the Field, The Tohono O'odham Community of A:L Pi'ichkiñ (Pitiquito), Sonora Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202767
Title:
Hua A'aga: Basket Stories from the Field, The Tohono O'odham Community of A:L Pi'ichkiñ (Pitiquito), Sonora Mexico
Author:
Naranjo, Reuben Vasquez Jr.
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Tohono O'odham Nation of southern Arizona and northern Sonora Mexico has two distinct and distinctive cultural, social, political and federal histories. The American government politically acknowledges one group while the other is entrenched in Mexican social policy that regards Indigenous peoples as equals to the Mestizo population known as campesinos or peasants. The Sonoran Tohono O'odham community of Al Pi'ichkin or Pitiquito, Sonora, Mexico, has managed to persist and survive into the twenty first century despite the presence of an international boundary and the assimilative efforts of Mexican socio-federal Indian policy.This is an exploration of the issue of cultural continuity within the community of Pitiquito, Sonora Mexico via the following eight themes which emerged from my field work: the oral tradition; kinship; tradition and modernity in 2007; the Feast of St. Francis at Magdalena de Kino; nationalism; importance of photography; identity; and cultural persistence. The final ceramic mural along with the accompanying essay will constitute my Ph.D. dissertation project.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Native American cultural persistence; Tribalism; American Indian Studies; Border tribes; Nationalism
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lomawaima, K. Tsianina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHua A'aga: Basket Stories from the Field, The Tohono O'odham Community of A:L Pi'ichkiñ (Pitiquito), Sonora Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorNaranjo, Reuben Vasquez Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNaranjo, Reuben Vasquez Jr.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Tohono O'odham Nation of southern Arizona and northern Sonora Mexico has two distinct and distinctive cultural, social, political and federal histories. The American government politically acknowledges one group while the other is entrenched in Mexican social policy that regards Indigenous peoples as equals to the Mestizo population known as campesinos or peasants. The Sonoran Tohono O'odham community of Al Pi'ichkin or Pitiquito, Sonora, Mexico, has managed to persist and survive into the twenty first century despite the presence of an international boundary and the assimilative efforts of Mexican socio-federal Indian policy.This is an exploration of the issue of cultural continuity within the community of Pitiquito, Sonora Mexico via the following eight themes which emerged from my field work: the oral tradition; kinship; tradition and modernity in 2007; the Feast of St. Francis at Magdalena de Kino; nationalism; importance of photography; identity; and cultural persistence. The final ceramic mural along with the accompanying essay will constitute my Ph.D. dissertation project.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNative American cultural persistenceen_US
dc.subjectTribalismen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectBorder tribesen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLomawaima, K. Tsianinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParezo, Nancy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKennedy, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrescia, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChabot, Auroreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLomawaima, K. Tsianinaen_US
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