Teacher Preparation for Instructing Middle School ELL Students: A North Carolina Piedmont Perspective

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202755
Title:
Teacher Preparation for Instructing Middle School ELL Students: A North Carolina Piedmont Perspective
Author:
Sox, Amanda Kay
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The North Carolina Public Schools, like other schools in the southeast, have experienced phenomenal growth in their ELL student populations in the last 15 years. This fairly recent influx of ELL students raises questions about the extent to which the schools, and more specifically, the teachers, are prepared to meet the needs of their linguistically diverse students. Unfortunately, few studies to date have investigated how teacher education programs (TEPs) and professional development opportunities are addressing this aspect of teacher preparation. This dissertation addresses the lack of current research as it pertains to both TEPs and professional development experiences of middle school working in the North Carolina Public Schools. Using a mixed methods design that combined survey research with open-ended interviews of focal participants, the author revealed that teachers had had limited preparation experiences at both the TEP and professional development levels. However, those who had had these experiences overall did exhibit some capacity to adapt instruction and relate to their ELLs in positive ways. The preparation, however, also lacked sociolinguistic awareness and awareness about the theoretical foundations that underlie these practices. The author concluded by relating the findings to the current research and discussed recommendations and implications for TEPs and professional development in North Carolina and the southern context.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Professional Development; Teacher Education Programs; Teacher Preparation; Language, Reading & Culture; English Language Learners; North Carolina
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeacher Preparation for Instructing Middle School ELL Students: A North Carolina Piedmont Perspectiveen_US
dc.creatorSox, Amanda Kayen_US
dc.contributor.authorSox, Amanda Kayen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe North Carolina Public Schools, like other schools in the southeast, have experienced phenomenal growth in their ELL student populations in the last 15 years. This fairly recent influx of ELL students raises questions about the extent to which the schools, and more specifically, the teachers, are prepared to meet the needs of their linguistically diverse students. Unfortunately, few studies to date have investigated how teacher education programs (TEPs) and professional development opportunities are addressing this aspect of teacher preparation. This dissertation addresses the lack of current research as it pertains to both TEPs and professional development experiences of middle school working in the North Carolina Public Schools. Using a mixed methods design that combined survey research with open-ended interviews of focal participants, the author revealed that teachers had had limited preparation experiences at both the TEP and professional development levels. However, those who had had these experiences overall did exhibit some capacity to adapt instruction and relate to their ELLs in positive ways. The preparation, however, also lacked sociolinguistic awareness and awareness about the theoretical foundations that underlie these practices. The author concluded by relating the findings to the current research and discussed recommendations and implications for TEPs and professional development in North Carolina and the southern context.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectProfessional Developmenten_US
dc.subjectTeacher Education Programsen_US
dc.subjectTeacher Preparationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
dc.subjectEnglish Language Learnersen_US
dc.subjectNorth Carolinaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRubinstein-Avila, Elianeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzalez, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReyes, Ilianaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRios-Aguilar, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRubinstein-Avila, Elianeen_US
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