Ecosystem Net Primary Production Responses to Changes in Precipitation Using an Annual Integrated MODIS EVI

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202736
Title:
Ecosystem Net Primary Production Responses to Changes in Precipitation Using an Annual Integrated MODIS EVI
Author:
Ponce Campos, Guillermo
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, the relationship of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) with precipitation using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from satellite data as surrogate for ANPP was assessed. To use EVI as a proxy for ANPP we extracted the satellite data from areas with uniform vegetation in a 2x2 km area for the multi-site approach.In the multi-site analysis in the United States our results showed a strong exponential relationship between iEVI and annual precipitation across the sites and climate regimes studied. We found convergence of all sites toward common and maximum rain use efficiency under the water-limited conditions represented by the driest year at each site. Measures of inter-annual variability in iEVI with rainfall variation across biomes were similar to that reported by Knapp and Smith (2001) in which the more herbaceous dominant sites were found to be most sensitive to interannual variations in precipitation with no relationships found in woodland sites.The relationship was also evaluated in the southern hemisphere using a multi-site analysis with information from satellite TRMM for precipitation and MOD13Q1 from MODIS for EVI values at calendar and hydrologic year periods. The tested sites were located across the 6 major land cover types inAustralia, obtained from MODIS MCD12Q1 product and used to compare the relationship across different biomes. The results showed significant agreement between the annual iEVI and annual precipitation across the biomes involved in this study showing non-significant differences between the calendar and hydrologic years for the 24 sites across different climatic conditions.At the regional scale we also assessed the ANPP-precipitation relationship across all of Australia. Precipitation data from TRMM was obtained at 0.25x0.25 degrees spatial resolution and monthly temporal resolution and EVI values were obtained from the CGM (Climate Grid Modeling) MOD13C1-16-days and 5.6km temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. Our results were in fair agreement with those from our first two studies and previous research and provided specific insights regarding the use iEVI as a proxy for productivity over extended regions as well as its combination with data sets from TRMM sensor for precipitation data.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Net Primary Productivity; precipitaiton; Rain use efficiency; TRMM; Soil, Water & Environmental Science; EVI; MODIS
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Huete, Alfredo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEcosystem Net Primary Production Responses to Changes in Precipitation Using an Annual Integrated MODIS EVIen_US
dc.creatorPonce Campos, Guillermoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPonce Campos, Guillermoen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the relationship of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) with precipitation using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from satellite data as surrogate for ANPP was assessed. To use EVI as a proxy for ANPP we extracted the satellite data from areas with uniform vegetation in a 2x2 km area for the multi-site approach.In the multi-site analysis in the United States our results showed a strong exponential relationship between iEVI and annual precipitation across the sites and climate regimes studied. We found convergence of all sites toward common and maximum rain use efficiency under the water-limited conditions represented by the driest year at each site. Measures of inter-annual variability in iEVI with rainfall variation across biomes were similar to that reported by Knapp and Smith (2001) in which the more herbaceous dominant sites were found to be most sensitive to interannual variations in precipitation with no relationships found in woodland sites.The relationship was also evaluated in the southern hemisphere using a multi-site analysis with information from satellite TRMM for precipitation and MOD13Q1 from MODIS for EVI values at calendar and hydrologic year periods. The tested sites were located across the 6 major land cover types inAustralia, obtained from MODIS MCD12Q1 product and used to compare the relationship across different biomes. The results showed significant agreement between the annual iEVI and annual precipitation across the biomes involved in this study showing non-significant differences between the calendar and hydrologic years for the 24 sites across different climatic conditions.At the regional scale we also assessed the ANPP-precipitation relationship across all of Australia. Precipitation data from TRMM was obtained at 0.25x0.25 degrees spatial resolution and monthly temporal resolution and EVI values were obtained from the CGM (Climate Grid Modeling) MOD13C1-16-days and 5.6km temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. Our results were in fair agreement with those from our first two studies and previous research and provided specific insights regarding the use iEVI as a proxy for productivity over extended regions as well as its combination with data sets from TRMM sensor for precipitation data.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNet Primary Productivityen_US
dc.subjectprecipitaitonen_US
dc.subjectRain use efficiencyen_US
dc.subjectTRMMen_US
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.subjectEVIen_US
dc.subjectMODISen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHuete, Alfredoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoran, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlenn, Eden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatthias, Allanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuete, Alfredoen_US
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