Wildfire Impacts on Ecosystem Resources: Case Studies in Arizona's Ponderosa Pine Forest Following the Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire of 2002

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202720
Title:
Wildfire Impacts on Ecosystem Resources: Case Studies in Arizona's Ponderosa Pine Forest Following the Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire of 2002
Author:
Stropki, Cody Lee
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire the largest in Arizona's history at the time of burning damaged and disrupted ecosystems resources and functioning in a largely mosaic pattern throughout the ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa) forests exposed to the burn. Impacts of this wildfire on ecosystems resources and functioning were studied from shortly after the cessation of the wildfire in late summer of 2002 through the spring of 2007 on two previously instrumented watersheds located on sandstone derived soils within the burn. One watershed was burned by a high severity (stand-replacing fire), while the other watershed burned in a low severity (stand-modifying) fire. This dissertation focuses on the effects fire severity had on watersheds resources and functioning in terms of the tree overstories, herbaceous understories, large and small mammals, avifauna, hydrologic functioning, soil water repellency, hillslope soil movement, and fuel loadings. The results of these studies indicated the cumulative impacts incurred to ecosystem resources, hydrologic functioning, and flammable fuels were much greater on the watershed exposed to the high severity (stand-replacing) fire. It is anticipated that the overall ecological and hydrologic function on the watershed burned by a high severity will not approach pre-fire conditions for many years. The watershed burned at a low severity, however, was approaching pre-fire conditions nearly five years after fire and is expected to be recovered within the next few years.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
hydrologic functioning; ponderosa pine; Rodeo-Chediski; Water Repellency; Natural Resources; Fire Impacts; fire severity
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ffolliott, Peter F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWildfire Impacts on Ecosystem Resources: Case Studies in Arizona's Ponderosa Pine Forest Following the Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire of 2002en_US
dc.creatorStropki, Cody Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorStropki, Cody Leeen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire the largest in Arizona's history at the time of burning damaged and disrupted ecosystems resources and functioning in a largely mosaic pattern throughout the ponderosa pine (Pinus Ponderosa) forests exposed to the burn. Impacts of this wildfire on ecosystems resources and functioning were studied from shortly after the cessation of the wildfire in late summer of 2002 through the spring of 2007 on two previously instrumented watersheds located on sandstone derived soils within the burn. One watershed was burned by a high severity (stand-replacing fire), while the other watershed burned in a low severity (stand-modifying) fire. This dissertation focuses on the effects fire severity had on watersheds resources and functioning in terms of the tree overstories, herbaceous understories, large and small mammals, avifauna, hydrologic functioning, soil water repellency, hillslope soil movement, and fuel loadings. The results of these studies indicated the cumulative impacts incurred to ecosystem resources, hydrologic functioning, and flammable fuels were much greater on the watershed exposed to the high severity (stand-replacing) fire. It is anticipated that the overall ecological and hydrologic function on the watershed burned by a high severity will not approach pre-fire conditions for many years. The watershed burned at a low severity, however, was approaching pre-fire conditions nearly five years after fire and is expected to be recovered within the next few years.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthydrologic functioningen_US
dc.subjectponderosa pineen_US
dc.subjectRodeo-Chediskien_US
dc.subjectWater Repellencyen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectFire Impactsen_US
dc.subjectfire severityen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNeary, Daniel G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRasmussen, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeBano, Leonarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
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