MICROENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDY OF MYOGENESIS SPATIAL ORGANIZATION AND ENDOTHELIAL CELL SMALL MESSENGER SIGNALING

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202702
Title:
MICROENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDY OF MYOGENESIS SPATIAL ORGANIZATION AND ENDOTHELIAL CELL SMALL MESSENGER SIGNALING
Author:
Junkin, Michael
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In complex organisms, the combined actions of multiple cells enable higher order functions while using only the building blocks of individual cells. Understanding the regulation of groups of cells is thus critical in order to uncover how single cells combine to produce higher levels of functionality. One principle input which regulates cell behavior is the surrounding cellular environment, many aspects of which are inherently nano- or microscale in nature. A system has therefore been developed which can replicate important micro- and nanoscale aspects of the cellular environment by providing inputs to groups of cells which mimic those found physiologically. This has been accomplished by developing a cell sensitive plasma surface patterning technique termed plasma lithography that produces area selective functional group modification to provide cell attachment guidance at sizes ranging from 100 nm to millimeters. This surface patterning system has further been coupled with additional inputs such as chemical and mechanical stimulation in order to investigate several areas where higher order functionality is observed based upon interactions of single cells. These investigations include study of an autocatalytic feedback mechanism which is involved in muscle formation and the behavior of small messenger signaling in networks of vascular cells.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Mechanical Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rong, Pak Kin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMICROENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDY OF MYOGENESIS SPATIAL ORGANIZATION AND ENDOTHELIAL CELL SMALL MESSENGER SIGNALINGen_US
dc.creatorJunkin, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorJunkin, Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn complex organisms, the combined actions of multiple cells enable higher order functions while using only the building blocks of individual cells. Understanding the regulation of groups of cells is thus critical in order to uncover how single cells combine to produce higher levels of functionality. One principle input which regulates cell behavior is the surrounding cellular environment, many aspects of which are inherently nano- or microscale in nature. A system has therefore been developed which can replicate important micro- and nanoscale aspects of the cellular environment by providing inputs to groups of cells which mimic those found physiologically. This has been accomplished by developing a cell sensitive plasma surface patterning technique termed plasma lithography that produces area selective functional group modification to provide cell attachment guidance at sizes ranging from 100 nm to millimeters. This surface patterning system has further been coupled with additional inputs such as chemical and mechanical stimulation in order to investigate several areas where higher order functionality is observed based upon interactions of single cells. These investigations include study of an autocatalytic feedback mechanism which is involved in muscle formation and the behavior of small messenger signaling in networks of vascular cells.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRong, Pak Kinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWu, Xiaoyien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVande Geest, Jonathanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRong, Pak Kinen_US
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