Assessing Efficacy of NanoCeram Filters For Virus Concentration From Water: Risk Assessment for Listeria and Salmonella in Food

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202530
Title:
Assessing Efficacy of NanoCeram Filters For Virus Concentration From Water: Risk Assessment for Listeria and Salmonella in Food
Author:
Soto Beltran, Johana Marcela
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Water quality, and therefore human health, may be significantly affected by the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms derived for improper disposal of wastewater to aquatic environments. Detection of waterborne viruses is complex due to the difficulties in concentrating the sample and then in detecting the virus by cell culture or molecular techniques. Methods used to concentrate enteric viruses from water have remained largely unchanged for nearly 30 years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires the use of 1MDS electropositive filters for concentrating enteric viruses from water; however, these filters are expensive for routine viral monitoring. The NanoCeram® filter, an electropositive cartridge filter, has been proposed as a new alternative for large volumes of water. The objective of the study was: to evaluate the effectiveness of NanoCeram® filters for the concentration of poliovirus-1 from wastewater samples and compare to 1MDS cartridge filters. This study suggested that NanoCeram® filters are a viable alternative to the use of 1MDS filters for viral monitoring in surface waters and wastewaters. L. monocytogenes outbreaks with Latin-style soft cheese have been well-documented; however, more information to characterize the human health risk associated with the consumption of queso fresco (QF) using unpasteurized milk is needed. The objectives of the study were: i) to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria, Escherichia coli, Salmonella and fecal coliforms in QF obtained from markets in the northwestern state of Sinaloa, Mexico, and ii) to address the human health impact associated with the consumption of QF contaminated with L. monocytogenes using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The study suggested that QF produced in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico have microbial loads above the maximum values recommended by the Official Mexican Regulations; and QMRA can be used to interpret microbial contamination data for impacts on public health.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
NanoCeram; Queso Fresco; Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Filters; Foodborne pathogens
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerba, Charles P.; Pepper, Ian L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessing Efficacy of NanoCeram Filters For Virus Concentration From Water: Risk Assessment for Listeria and Salmonella in Fooden_US
dc.creatorSoto Beltran, Johana Marcelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoto Beltran, Johana Marcelaen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWater quality, and therefore human health, may be significantly affected by the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms derived for improper disposal of wastewater to aquatic environments. Detection of waterborne viruses is complex due to the difficulties in concentrating the sample and then in detecting the virus by cell culture or molecular techniques. Methods used to concentrate enteric viruses from water have remained largely unchanged for nearly 30 years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires the use of 1MDS electropositive filters for concentrating enteric viruses from water; however, these filters are expensive for routine viral monitoring. The NanoCeram® filter, an electropositive cartridge filter, has been proposed as a new alternative for large volumes of water. The objective of the study was: to evaluate the effectiveness of NanoCeram® filters for the concentration of poliovirus-1 from wastewater samples and compare to 1MDS cartridge filters. This study suggested that NanoCeram® filters are a viable alternative to the use of 1MDS filters for viral monitoring in surface waters and wastewaters. L. monocytogenes outbreaks with Latin-style soft cheese have been well-documented; however, more information to characterize the human health risk associated with the consumption of queso fresco (QF) using unpasteurized milk is needed. The objectives of the study were: i) to evaluate the prevalence of Listeria, Escherichia coli, Salmonella and fecal coliforms in QF obtained from markets in the northwestern state of Sinaloa, Mexico, and ii) to address the human health impact associated with the consumption of QF contaminated with L. monocytogenes using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The study suggested that QF produced in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico have microbial loads above the maximum values recommended by the Official Mexican Regulations; and QMRA can be used to interpret microbial contamination data for impacts on public health.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNanoCeramen_US
dc.subjectQueso Frescoen_US
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.subjectFiltersen_US
dc.subjectFoodborne pathogensen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Kelly A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBright, Kelly B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChaidez Quiroz, Cristobalen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
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