The Diet Study in Lactating Women: A Mediterranean-Style Diet Intervention and its Effects on Postpartum Weight Loss, Body Composition and Select Biomarkers of Inflammation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202529
Title:
The Diet Study in Lactating Women: A Mediterranean-Style Diet Intervention and its Effects on Postpartum Weight Loss, Body Composition and Select Biomarkers of Inflammation
Author:
Stendell-Hollis, Nicole
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Obesity-related diseases account for the majority of morbidity and mortality in U.S. adults. An estimated 4 million women in the United States deliver an infant annually, of which approximately 34% are overweight/obese prior to pregnancy. More than 30% of these women gain weight that exceeds the IOM’s recommendations; increasing their risk of postpartum weight retention and possibly increasing their risk of greater weight gain and retention over time. This research sought to test the efficacy of a traditional MED diet for 4-months on weight loss/control and biomarkers of inflammation in breastfeeding women compared to women randomized to the USDA’s MyPyramid diet for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding (control diet). At baseline, the women (N=129) were 29.7±4.6 years, overweight (BMI: 27.2±4.9 kg/m2), and primarily non-Hispanic white (75.2%). The majority of women were exclusively breastfeeding (73.6%) and a mean 17.5 weeks postpartum. Adherence to the MED diet was evaluated via calculation of the MED diet score from validated FFQs administered pre- and post- the diet intervention. Anthropometric measurements (body weight, body fat, and waist and hip circumference) and biosamples (blood, urine, and breast milk) were collected at baseline and 4-months (diet completion). Biomarkers of inflammation (IL-6 and TNF-α) were assessed via standard ELISA kits. The MED diet score was increased by 0.68±2.74 and 0.27±1.57 for the MED and control group, respectively. Increases in fish and dairy intake and a decrease in meat/poultry intake were significantly different between diet groups (P<0.05). Participants in both diet groups demonstrated significant (P=0.002) reductions in all anthropometric measurements; no significant between group differences were shown. A significant decrease in TNF-α, but not IL-6, was demonstrated in both diet groups. There were no significant between group differences. Both the MED diet and the USDA’s MyPyramid diet were effective in reducing anthropometric measurements and inflammation in postpartum breastfeeding women.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
postpartum; weight loss; Nutritional Sciences; inflammation; Mediterranean diet
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Thomson, Cynthia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Diet Study in Lactating Women: A Mediterranean-Style Diet Intervention and its Effects on Postpartum Weight Loss, Body Composition and Select Biomarkers of Inflammationen_US
dc.creatorStendell-Hollis, Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorStendell-Hollis, Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractObesity-related diseases account for the majority of morbidity and mortality in U.S. adults. An estimated 4 million women in the United States deliver an infant annually, of which approximately 34% are overweight/obese prior to pregnancy. More than 30% of these women gain weight that exceeds the IOM’s recommendations; increasing their risk of postpartum weight retention and possibly increasing their risk of greater weight gain and retention over time. This research sought to test the efficacy of a traditional MED diet for 4-months on weight loss/control and biomarkers of inflammation in breastfeeding women compared to women randomized to the USDA’s MyPyramid diet for Pregnancy and Breastfeeding (control diet). At baseline, the women (N=129) were 29.7±4.6 years, overweight (BMI: 27.2±4.9 kg/m2), and primarily non-Hispanic white (75.2%). The majority of women were exclusively breastfeeding (73.6%) and a mean 17.5 weeks postpartum. Adherence to the MED diet was evaluated via calculation of the MED diet score from validated FFQs administered pre- and post- the diet intervention. Anthropometric measurements (body weight, body fat, and waist and hip circumference) and biosamples (blood, urine, and breast milk) were collected at baseline and 4-months (diet completion). Biomarkers of inflammation (IL-6 and TNF-α) were assessed via standard ELISA kits. The MED diet score was increased by 0.68±2.74 and 0.27±1.57 for the MED and control group, respectively. Increases in fish and dairy intake and a decrease in meat/poultry intake were significantly different between diet groups (P<0.05). Participants in both diet groups demonstrated significant (P=0.002) reductions in all anthropometric measurements; no significant between group differences were shown. A significant decrease in TNF-α, but not IL-6, was demonstrated in both diet groups. There were no significant between group differences. Both the MED diet and the USDA’s MyPyramid diet were effective in reducing anthropometric measurements and inflammation in postpartum breastfeeding women.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectpostpartumen_US
dc.subjectweight lossen_US
dc.subjectNutritional Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectinflammationen_US
dc.subjectMediterranean dieten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorThomson, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Patricia A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWinzerling, Joyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaines, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThomson, Cynthia A.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.