Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Patterns among Rural Hispanic and American Indian Women in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/202518
Title:
Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Patterns among Rural Hispanic and American Indian Women in Arizona
Author:
Nuño, Thomas
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Breast and cervical cancer disparities among Hispanic and American Indian women are a significant public health problem. Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm among Hispanic women. Cervical cancer has a higher incidence and mortality among Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic White women. Breast cancer detection often comes late for American Indian women and breast cancer survival for this population is relatively poor. Hispanic and American Indian women who reside in rural areas of Arizona are especially at-risk of non-participation in breast and cervical cancer screening programs. This dissertation utilized data from two sources: a health-education intervention trial designed to increase mammography screening among women living in a rural area along the U.S.-Mexico border of Arizona and survey data from multiple years of the Arizona Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (BRFS) focusing on breast and cervical cancer screening self-reported behaviors. The purpose of the dissertation research was to identify factors associated with cancer screening behaviors among Hispanic and American Indian women that reside in rural Arizona settings. Hispanic women who participated in the promotora-based educational intervention program were more likely to report receiving a mammogram at the followup compared to women who did not participate in the program. Results from both the baseline community survey and the BRFS showed that Hispanic women who received prior recommendations from a clinician to get both mammography and Pap smear were more likely to report they received a mammogram within the past year and a Pap smear within the past three years. Rural Hispanic and American Indian women reported lower rates of ever having had breast and cervical cancer screening compared to their urban counterparts. Breast and cervical cancer screening use in these populations can potentially be increased with at least two strategies. First, clinician recommendation of both mammograms and Pap smears and opportunistic screening during regular clinic visits may increase breast and cervical cancer screening coverage. Secondly, culturallyappropriate interventions that utilize promotoras or lay health advisors could increase screening rates. In conclusion, Hispanic and American Indian women that reside in rural areas of Arizona, whether throughout the State or along the U.S.-Mexico border, are two underserved populations in Arizona with low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening that need to be addressed in order to reduce the burden of cancer in these populations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Health disparities; Hispanic; Rural health; Women's health; Epidemiology; American Indian; Cancer screening
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Epidemiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harris, Robin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBreast and Cervical Cancer Screening Patterns among Rural Hispanic and American Indian Women in Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorNuño, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorNuño, Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBreast and cervical cancer disparities among Hispanic and American Indian women are a significant public health problem. Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm among Hispanic women. Cervical cancer has a higher incidence and mortality among Hispanic women compared to non-Hispanic White women. Breast cancer detection often comes late for American Indian women and breast cancer survival for this population is relatively poor. Hispanic and American Indian women who reside in rural areas of Arizona are especially at-risk of non-participation in breast and cervical cancer screening programs. This dissertation utilized data from two sources: a health-education intervention trial designed to increase mammography screening among women living in a rural area along the U.S.-Mexico border of Arizona and survey data from multiple years of the Arizona Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (BRFS) focusing on breast and cervical cancer screening self-reported behaviors. The purpose of the dissertation research was to identify factors associated with cancer screening behaviors among Hispanic and American Indian women that reside in rural Arizona settings. Hispanic women who participated in the promotora-based educational intervention program were more likely to report receiving a mammogram at the followup compared to women who did not participate in the program. Results from both the baseline community survey and the BRFS showed that Hispanic women who received prior recommendations from a clinician to get both mammography and Pap smear were more likely to report they received a mammogram within the past year and a Pap smear within the past three years. Rural Hispanic and American Indian women reported lower rates of ever having had breast and cervical cancer screening compared to their urban counterparts. Breast and cervical cancer screening use in these populations can potentially be increased with at least two strategies. First, clinician recommendation of both mammograms and Pap smears and opportunistic screening during regular clinic visits may increase breast and cervical cancer screening coverage. Secondly, culturallyappropriate interventions that utilize promotoras or lay health advisors could increase screening rates. In conclusion, Hispanic and American Indian women that reside in rural areas of Arizona, whether throughout the State or along the U.S.-Mexico border, are two underserved populations in Arizona with low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening that need to be addressed in order to reduce the burden of cancer in these populations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHealth disparitiesen_US
dc.subjectHispanicen_US
dc.subjectRural healthen_US
dc.subjectWomen's healthen_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen_US
dc.subjectCancer screeningen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarris, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarcia, Franciscoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartinez, Maria Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEstrada, Antonioen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarris, Robinen_US
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