Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/201497
Title:
Orthographic Influences on Sublexical Processing
Author:
Suddarth, Rachael
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Adults with language impairment have poor language skills, but may or may not have reading deficits. For those identified with literacy difficulties as children, deficits in the skills related to sublexical level decoding skills can persist into adulthood. Decoding deficits, current or remediated, would implicate the sublexical interaction of orthography and phonology. In addition, the heterogeneous reading profiles of adults with language impairment provide an opportunity to examine whether the deficits in this bidirectional link between orthography and phonology are related to reading deficit specifically or language impairment globally. Sixty adults, 30 with language impairment and 30 with typical language, participated in this study. Nonword stimuli, orthogonally varied based on orthographic and phonological neighborhood density, were presented in two sublexical tasks, nonword repetition and nonword spelling. The experiment revealed a pattern of similar responses for adults with and without language impairment. However, adults with impaired language had significantly poorer performance on both the nonword repetition task and the nonword spelling task. Additional analyses indicated that both language and literacy measures predicted the overall performance on the orthogonally varied nonword repetition and nonword spelling tasks. This study highlights the existence of a bidirectional influence between phonological and orthographic processing. For adults with language impairment it appears that this bidirectional link is intact at the sublexical level.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
learning disability; literacy; Orthographic Consistency Effect; Sublexical; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; adults; language impairment
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Plante, Elena

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOrthographic Influences on Sublexical Processingen_US
dc.creatorSuddarth, Rachaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuddarth, Rachaelen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdults with language impairment have poor language skills, but may or may not have reading deficits. For those identified with literacy difficulties as children, deficits in the skills related to sublexical level decoding skills can persist into adulthood. Decoding deficits, current or remediated, would implicate the sublexical interaction of orthography and phonology. In addition, the heterogeneous reading profiles of adults with language impairment provide an opportunity to examine whether the deficits in this bidirectional link between orthography and phonology are related to reading deficit specifically or language impairment globally. Sixty adults, 30 with language impairment and 30 with typical language, participated in this study. Nonword stimuli, orthogonally varied based on orthographic and phonological neighborhood density, were presented in two sublexical tasks, nonword repetition and nonword spelling. The experiment revealed a pattern of similar responses for adults with and without language impairment. However, adults with impaired language had significantly poorer performance on both the nonword repetition task and the nonword spelling task. Additional analyses indicated that both language and literacy measures predicted the overall performance on the orthogonally varied nonword repetition and nonword spelling tasks. This study highlights the existence of a bidirectional influence between phonological and orthographic processing. For adults with language impairment it appears that this bidirectional link is intact at the sublexical level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectlearning disabilityen_US
dc.subjectliteracyen_US
dc.subjectOrthographic Consistency Effecten_US
dc.subjectSublexicalen_US
dc.subjectSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectadultsen_US
dc.subjectlanguage impairmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeeson, Pelagieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMary, Alten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen_US
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