The Role and Status of Palestininan Women in the Struggle for National Liberation: Static or Dynamic?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/201492
Title:
The Role and Status of Palestininan Women in the Struggle for National Liberation: Static or Dynamic?
Author:
Toenjes, Ashley
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis argues that the elite and urban women leaders of the Palestinian women's movement neglected to engage rural women and women living in refugee camps as their equals in a women's movement. Further, despite women's active presence in the public sphere, the sphere remained defined in masculine terms. As a result, Palestinian women, as "guests" in the domain of men, were easily pushed out after they had served their purpose in the nationalist crisis. What is remarkable is that even after Palestinian men reclaimed the public sphere, Palestinian women remained politically active in the private sphere. In order to understand how this was possible, we must look more closely at the terms "public sphere" and "private sphere".
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Palestine; Public sphere; West Bank; Women; Near Eastern Studies; Hamas; Hijab
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nassar, Maha T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role and Status of Palestininan Women in the Struggle for National Liberation: Static or Dynamic?en_US
dc.creatorToenjes, Ashleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorToenjes, Ashleyen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that the elite and urban women leaders of the Palestinian women's movement neglected to engage rural women and women living in refugee camps as their equals in a women's movement. Further, despite women's active presence in the public sphere, the sphere remained defined in masculine terms. As a result, Palestinian women, as "guests" in the domain of men, were easily pushed out after they had served their purpose in the nationalist crisis. What is remarkable is that even after Palestinian men reclaimed the public sphere, Palestinian women remained politically active in the private sphere. In order to understand how this was possible, we must look more closely at the terms "public sphere" and "private sphere".en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectPalestineen_US
dc.subjectPublic sphereen_US
dc.subjectWest Banken_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
dc.subjectNear Eastern Studiesen_US
dc.subjectHamasen_US
dc.subjectHijaben_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNassar, Maha T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Charles D. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leila O.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.