An Investigation of Mnemonic Strategies Designed to Improve Prospective Memory Among Young and Older Adults

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/201489
Title:
An Investigation of Mnemonic Strategies Designed to Improve Prospective Memory Among Young and Older Adults
Author:
McFarland, Craig P.
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Implementation intentions have been shown to improve prospective memory performance among a variety of populations. In two studies, the effectiveness of implementation intentions was examined among young and older adults. In Experiment 1 64 young adults were placed into one of four instructional conditions (Read-Only, Imagery, Implementation Intention, Combined) before completing a laboratory-based prospective memory task. Results reveal that prospective memory performance improves under each of the three experimental conditions, but that there is no additional benefit of combining imagery with implementation intentions. In a novel finding, imagery alone produced improvements comparable to implementation intentions. Experiment 2 investigated the effect of implementation intentions among 32 older adults, who were characterized as possessing high- or low-frontal function based on neuropsychological test performance. Implementation intentions improved prospective memory among both groups, regardless of frontal function. The results of these studies suggest that implementation intentions can improve prospective memory among both young and older adults. Importantly, these findings reveal that imagery alone may be an effective means of improving prospective memory. Additionally, that implementation intentions improved prospective memory among older adults, regardless of frontal function, raises important questions about potential mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of implementation intentions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
imagery; implementation intentions; prospective memory; young adults; Psychology; aging; frontal lobe
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glisky, Elizabeth L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of Mnemonic Strategies Designed to Improve Prospective Memory Among Young and Older Adultsen_US
dc.creatorMcFarland, Craig P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcFarland, Craig P.en_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractImplementation intentions have been shown to improve prospective memory performance among a variety of populations. In two studies, the effectiveness of implementation intentions was examined among young and older adults. In Experiment 1 64 young adults were placed into one of four instructional conditions (Read-Only, Imagery, Implementation Intention, Combined) before completing a laboratory-based prospective memory task. Results reveal that prospective memory performance improves under each of the three experimental conditions, but that there is no additional benefit of combining imagery with implementation intentions. In a novel finding, imagery alone produced improvements comparable to implementation intentions. Experiment 2 investigated the effect of implementation intentions among 32 older adults, who were characterized as possessing high- or low-frontal function based on neuropsychological test performance. Implementation intentions improved prospective memory among both groups, regardless of frontal function. The results of these studies suggest that implementation intentions can improve prospective memory among both young and older adults. Importantly, these findings reveal that imagery alone may be an effective means of improving prospective memory. Additionally, that implementation intentions improved prospective memory among older adults, regardless of frontal function, raises important questions about potential mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of implementation intentions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectimageryen_US
dc.subjectimplementation intentionsen_US
dc.subjectprospective memoryen_US
dc.subjectyoung adultsen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
dc.subjectfrontal lobeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabeth L.en_US
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