Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/201371
Title:
Describing the Tradeoffs Between Persistence and Productivity in Alfalfa
Author:
Hotchkiss, Jay R.; Smith, Steven E.; Conta, Debra M.
Issue Date:
Sep-1991
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Forage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Substantial plant loss is a commonly accepted phenomenon in commercial alfalfa production. Frequently less than 2% of the seeds originally sown are present in productive mature stands. Optimum yields may not be achieved if the small proportion of plants that survive do not represent the most productive individuals in the original population. We began a study in 1989 to describe the relationships between survival (persistence) and productivity in alfalfa. Sixty 5 yr-old plants were dug from a field of CUF -101 in Pinal Co. (= "Persistent population "). Field performance of progenies of these plants were compared with those of 60 greenhouse -grown CUF-101 plants (= "Random population ") in a 2-yr study in Tucson. In the second year of production spring and fall forage yield and average rate of stem elongation were significantly lower in the Persistent population than in the Random population. These data suggest that plants that are able to persist for the average life of a stand may represent a subset of the original sown population which exhibit more conservative growth patterns. This indicates that simultaneous selection for traits associated with productivity and persistence may be necessary in alfalfa breeding.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Grain -- Arizona; Forage plants -- Arizona; Alfalfa -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
370090; Series P-90

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleDescribing the Tradeoffs Between Persistence and Productivity in Alfalfaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHotchkiss, Jay R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Steven E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorConta, Debra M.en_US
dc.date.issued1991-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalForage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractSubstantial plant loss is a commonly accepted phenomenon in commercial alfalfa production. Frequently less than 2% of the seeds originally sown are present in productive mature stands. Optimum yields may not be achieved if the small proportion of plants that survive do not represent the most productive individuals in the original population. We began a study in 1989 to describe the relationships between survival (persistence) and productivity in alfalfa. Sixty 5 yr-old plants were dug from a field of CUF -101 in Pinal Co. (= "Persistent population "). Field performance of progenies of these plants were compared with those of 60 greenhouse -grown CUF-101 plants (= "Random population ") in a 2-yr study in Tucson. In the second year of production spring and fall forage yield and average rate of stem elongation were significantly lower in the Persistent population than in the Random population. These data suggest that plants that are able to persist for the average life of a stand may represent a subset of the original sown population which exhibit more conservative growth patterns. This indicates that simultaneous selection for traits associated with productivity and persistence may be necessary in alfalfa breeding.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectGrain -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectForage plants -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectAlfalfa -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/201371-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370090en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-90en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.