Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/200816
Title:
Comparison of Residual Nitrate and Fertilizer Nitrogen Efficiency in Basin Irrigated Wheat
Author:
Doerge, T.; Knowles, T.; Ottman, M.; Clark, L.
Issue Date:
Sep-1988
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Forage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
The relative efficiencies of residual soil NO₃⁻N and fertilizer Nin basin - irrigated wheat production are not well defined. A two-year field study was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center to investigate what these N efficiencies are under optimum yielding conditions. 'Aldura' durum wheat was grown on the same field site two years in succession. In 1987 a wide range of fertilizer N (0 to 419 lbs /A) applications resulted in residual NO₃⁻N accumulations of 36 to 140 lbs /A in the surface four feet of soil. Residual N plots were split in 1988 with one subplot receiving no additional N while the other was treated with 145 lbs of fertilizer N /A. Grain yield response curves for the –N and +N subplots were used to estimate the marginal rate of substitution (MRS) of soil NO₃⁻N for fertilizer N. The marginal efficiency of residual NO₃⁻N was a constant 16.7 lbs. grain produced /lb. of N across the range of profile N values in this study, while the marginal efficiency of fertilizer N varied from over 17 to below 6 lbs. grain /lb. N. When basin- irrigated wheat is supplied with adequate, but not excessive N, the MRS of soil vs. fertilizer N is about 1:1 although absolute N efficiencies under basin irrigation are considerably lower than those achieved in other grain production systems.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Grain -- Arizona; Forage plants -- Arizona; Barley -- Arizona; Oats -- Arizona; Wheat -- Arizona; Barley -- Fertility; Oats -- Fertility; Wheat -- Fertility
Series/Report no.:
Series P-74; 370074

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleComparison of Residual Nitrate and Fertilizer Nitrogen Efficiency in Basin Irrigated Wheaten_US
dc.contributor.authorDoerge, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOttman, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, L.en_US
dc.date.issued1988-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalForage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe relative efficiencies of residual soil NO₃⁻N and fertilizer Nin basin - irrigated wheat production are not well defined. A two-year field study was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center to investigate what these N efficiencies are under optimum yielding conditions. 'Aldura' durum wheat was grown on the same field site two years in succession. In 1987 a wide range of fertilizer N (0 to 419 lbs /A) applications resulted in residual NO₃⁻N accumulations of 36 to 140 lbs /A in the surface four feet of soil. Residual N plots were split in 1988 with one subplot receiving no additional N while the other was treated with 145 lbs of fertilizer N /A. Grain yield response curves for the –N and +N subplots were used to estimate the marginal rate of substitution (MRS) of soil NO₃⁻N for fertilizer N. The marginal efficiency of residual NO₃⁻N was a constant 16.7 lbs. grain produced /lb. of N across the range of profile N values in this study, while the marginal efficiency of fertilizer N varied from over 17 to below 6 lbs. grain /lb. N. When basin- irrigated wheat is supplied with adequate, but not excessive N, the MRS of soil vs. fertilizer N is about 1:1 although absolute N efficiencies under basin irrigation are considerably lower than those achieved in other grain production systems.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectGrain -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectForage plants -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectOats -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Fertilityen_US
dc.subjectOats -- Fertilityen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Fertilityen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/200816-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-74en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370074en_US
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