Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/200484
Title:
Crop Yield Variability in Irrigated Wheat
Author:
Husaker, Douglas; Bucks, Dale
Issue Date:
Sep-1986
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Forage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Optimum design and management of irrigated wheat production is limited by the scarcity of information available on yield variability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial variability in soil-water parameters and the effects compared to grain yield response under level-basin irrigation. Three levels of seasonal irrigation water and two border lengths were used. Grain yields were found to increase significantly with the amount of water applied and soil water depletion (estimate of crop evapotranspiration), although yield variability was greater with reduced or deficit irrigations. Variations in soil water content were responsible for about 22% of the variability in grain yield, indicating that other soil and crop- related factors had a significant influence on production. Spatial dependence was exhibited over a greater distance at the wetter compared with the drier irrigation regimes.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Grain -- Arizona; Forage plants -- Arizona; Barley -- Arizona; Wheat -- Arizona; Barley -- Irrigation; Wheat -- Irrigation
Series/Report no.:
370067; Series P-67

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleCrop Yield Variability in Irrigated Wheaten_US
dc.contributor.authorHusaker, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.authorBucks, Daleen_US
dc.date.issued1986-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalForage and Grain: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractOptimum design and management of irrigated wheat production is limited by the scarcity of information available on yield variability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial variability in soil-water parameters and the effects compared to grain yield response under level-basin irrigation. Three levels of seasonal irrigation water and two border lengths were used. Grain yields were found to increase significantly with the amount of water applied and soil water depletion (estimate of crop evapotranspiration), although yield variability was greater with reduced or deficit irrigations. Variations in soil water content were responsible for about 22% of the variability in grain yield, indicating that other soil and crop- related factors had a significant influence on production. Spatial dependence was exhibited over a greater distance at the wetter compared with the drier irrigation regimes.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectGrain -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectForage plants -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectBarley -- Irrigationen_US
dc.subjectWheat -- Irrigationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/200484-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370067en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-67en_US
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