Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/198166
Title:
Weed Management and Agronomic Performance of a Cotton-Barely Double Crop Rotation
Author:
Adu-Tutu, K. O.; McCloskey, W. B.; Husman, S. H.; Clay, P.; Ottman, M. J.; Martin, E. C.; Teegerstrom, T.
Issue Date:
May-2005
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Report
Abstract:
The tillage operations required to grow an annual barley and cotton crop rotation were reduced by eliminating tillage prior to planting cotton, eliminating cultivations for weed control in cotton, and especially by eliminating tillage following cotton. A light activated, weed sensing automatic spot-spray system reduced the amount of spray volume and herbicide used by 40% to 60% at Marana and 36% to 56% at Maricopa in 2004. At Maricopa, a large number of volunteer cotton plants in the furrows of early planted no-till cotton reduced the spray volume savings from using the weed sensing automatic spot-spray system. Weed control was similar with the weed sensing, automatic spot-spray system compared to the conventional continuous spray system for most weed species but weeds with narrow leaf, upright leaf canopies such as sprangletop, barley and skeleton weed were more difficult to detect and control. In both Marana and Maricopa, there were yield differences between treatments related to planting date, with late-planted cotton yielding less than early-planted cotton. At Marana, the early-planted conventional tillage cotton out-yielded the barley cover crop, early-planted no-till cotton treatment. At Maricopa, there were no yield differences between the two early planted cotton treatments; however, the late-planted conventionally tilled cotton yielded 28% more than the late-planted no-till cotton. Although the yield comparisons are not yet definitive, it appears that in some situations no-till cotton may yield less than conventionally tilled cotton. At Maricopa, the height of cereal crop stubble did not affect subsequent cotton establishment, field populations, plant height or lint production (2003 and 2004) and the position or node of the first fruiting branch and the first retained boll were similarly unaffected in 2004.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Weed control
Series/Report no.:
az1366; Series P-142

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleWeed Management and Agronomic Performance of a Cotton-Barely Double Crop Rotationen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdu-Tutu, K. O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCloskey, W. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHusman, S. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClay, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOttman, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, E. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTeegerstrom, T.en_US
dc.date.issued2005-05-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe tillage operations required to grow an annual barley and cotton crop rotation were reduced by eliminating tillage prior to planting cotton, eliminating cultivations for weed control in cotton, and especially by eliminating tillage following cotton. A light activated, weed sensing automatic spot-spray system reduced the amount of spray volume and herbicide used by 40% to 60% at Marana and 36% to 56% at Maricopa in 2004. At Maricopa, a large number of volunteer cotton plants in the furrows of early planted no-till cotton reduced the spray volume savings from using the weed sensing automatic spot-spray system. Weed control was similar with the weed sensing, automatic spot-spray system compared to the conventional continuous spray system for most weed species but weeds with narrow leaf, upright leaf canopies such as sprangletop, barley and skeleton weed were more difficult to detect and control. In both Marana and Maricopa, there were yield differences between treatments related to planting date, with late-planted cotton yielding less than early-planted cotton. At Marana, the early-planted conventional tillage cotton out-yielded the barley cover crop, early-planted no-till cotton treatment. At Maricopa, there were no yield differences between the two early planted cotton treatments; however, the late-planted conventionally tilled cotton yielded 28% more than the late-planted no-till cotton. Although the yield comparisons are not yet definitive, it appears that in some situations no-till cotton may yield less than conventionally tilled cotton. At Maricopa, the height of cereal crop stubble did not affect subsequent cotton establishment, field populations, plant height or lint production (2003 and 2004) and the position or node of the first fruiting branch and the first retained boll were similarly unaffected in 2004.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectWeed controlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/198166-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesaz1366en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-142en_US
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