Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/198130
Title:
Acala/Upland Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 2003
Author:
Clark, L. J.; Ellsworth, K. F.; Norton, E. R.
Issue Date:
May-2004
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Report
Abstract:
Eight Acala varieties from New Mexico(4), California(3) and Arizona(1) along with thirteen upland varieties of interest to the area were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in Graham county at an elevation of 2950 feet. The highest yielding variety in this study was DP 555BR with a yield of 2203 pounds of lint per acre, but FM991BR produced the highest gross revenue per acre at $1527 per acre. Sierra, a new Acala variety from California, was the highest yielding Acala with a lint yield of 1872 pounds per acre and a gross revenue of $1324 per acre. The average lint yield was 500 pounds per acre higher that the 2002 season indicating that 2003 was an above average cotton growing year and that the heat units per day in the week following planting were above the threshold. In addition to the yield , several other agronomic variables were measured. These included plant height, total nodes, and boll weights. From plant height and total nodes the height to node ratios were calculated. Differences were seen between these variables by variety but the most notable point was that the plants were robust in their growth habit and fruiting forms were heavier than the previous year. HVI fiber quality data were reported and estimated values (in cents per pound of lint) were calculated. The HVI data showed an average fiber length of 1.13 inches, with only one variety producing a less than 1.10, and seven varieties having fiber of 1.15 inches or longer. A New Mexico experimental variety had the longest fiber at 1.18 inches. The average fiber strength was 32.1 grams per tex and the same NM experimental produced the strongest fiber. In general, all of the varieties included in this study had very good fiber.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Variety testing
Series/Report no.:
AZ1335; Series P-138

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleAcala/Upland Cotton Variety Trial, Safford Agricultural Center, 2003en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, L. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, K. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, E. R.en_US
dc.date.issued2004-05-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractEight Acala varieties from New Mexico(4), California(3) and Arizona(1) along with thirteen upland varieties of interest to the area were tested in a replicated small plot trial on the Safford Agricultural Center in Graham county at an elevation of 2950 feet. The highest yielding variety in this study was DP 555BR with a yield of 2203 pounds of lint per acre, but FM991BR produced the highest gross revenue per acre at $1527 per acre. Sierra, a new Acala variety from California, was the highest yielding Acala with a lint yield of 1872 pounds per acre and a gross revenue of $1324 per acre. The average lint yield was 500 pounds per acre higher that the 2002 season indicating that 2003 was an above average cotton growing year and that the heat units per day in the week following planting were above the threshold. In addition to the yield , several other agronomic variables were measured. These included plant height, total nodes, and boll weights. From plant height and total nodes the height to node ratios were calculated. Differences were seen between these variables by variety but the most notable point was that the plants were robust in their growth habit and fruiting forms were heavier than the previous year. HVI fiber quality data were reported and estimated values (in cents per pound of lint) were calculated. The HVI data showed an average fiber length of 1.13 inches, with only one variety producing a less than 1.10, and seven varieties having fiber of 1.15 inches or longer. A New Mexico experimental variety had the longest fiber at 1.18 inches. The average fiber strength was 32.1 grams per tex and the same NM experimental produced the strongest fiber. In general, all of the varieties included in this study had very good fiber.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVariety testingen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/198130-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1335en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-138en_US
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