Response of Micro-Sprinkler Irrigated ‘Lisbon’ lemons to N Rate and Source on a Superstition Sand

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/198115
Title:
Response of Micro-Sprinkler Irrigated ‘Lisbon’ lemons to N Rate and Source on a Superstition Sand
Author:
Sanchez, C. A.; Peralta, M.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Citrus Research Report
Abstract:
Much of the citrus produced in southwestern Arizona is grown on sandy soils. Because these soils have a low ion exchange capacity, are highly permeable to water, and are prone to nitrate leaching, achieving efficient N management presents a continuing challenge. Studies were conducted during 1999, 2000, and 2001 to evaluate the response of micro-sprinkler irrigated lemons to N rate (0, 1.8, and 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1) and N source (UN32, CAN-17, CN9, and mixed program) on Superstition Sand. Lemon yield increased by N rate during the first and second harvests in 1999, 2000, and 2001. In 1999, yields increased linearly to 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1 but in 2000 and 2001 yields were maximized at 1.8 kg N tree-1 yr-1. In 1999 where larger increments of N were applied over a smaller time period relative to the other seasons, UN32 seemed to decrease yields at the highest N rate. There were no significant effects to N source in 2000 and 2001.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Citrus fruits -- Arizona; Fertilization practices
Series/Report no.:
AZ1331; Series P-137
Sponsors:
Arizona Citrus Research Council

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleResponse of Micro-Sprinkler Irrigated ‘Lisbon’ lemons to N Rate and Source on a Superstition Sanden_US
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, C. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeralta, M.en_US
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCitrus Research Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractMuch of the citrus produced in southwestern Arizona is grown on sandy soils. Because these soils have a low ion exchange capacity, are highly permeable to water, and are prone to nitrate leaching, achieving efficient N management presents a continuing challenge. Studies were conducted during 1999, 2000, and 2001 to evaluate the response of micro-sprinkler irrigated lemons to N rate (0, 1.8, and 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1) and N source (UN32, CAN-17, CN9, and mixed program) on Superstition Sand. Lemon yield increased by N rate during the first and second harvests in 1999, 2000, and 2001. In 1999, yields increased linearly to 3.6 kg N tree-1 yr-1 but in 2000 and 2001 yields were maximized at 1.8 kg N tree-1 yr-1. In 1999 where larger increments of N were applied over a smaller time period relative to the other seasons, UN32 seemed to decrease yields at the highest N rate. There were no significant effects to N source in 2000 and 2001.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus fruits -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectFertilization practicesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/198115-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1331en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-137en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipArizona Citrus Research Councilen_US
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