Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/197490
Title:
Effects of High Frequency Irrigation on Irrigation Uniformity II
Author:
Martin, E. C.; Wegge, R.; Sheedy, M.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Cooperative Extension
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Another year of data was collected to determine the effects of high frequency irrigation on irrigation uniformity in cotton production. A field located at the Marana Agricultural Center was split into two treatments. Treatment one was irrigated at approximately 35% depletion of available water in the plant rootzone. Treatment two was irrigated at approximately 65% depletion in the crop rootzone. Increased frequency of irrigation has shown improved yields in many cotton studies. However, these more frequent and lighter irrigation applications may cause problems with irrigation uniformity. Frequent rains during critical time periods made it difficult to ascertain the impact of the irrigation schedule on uniformity. However, the less frequent, heavier application rate did result in a more uniform irrigation.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Irrigation
Series/Report no.:
AZ1170

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEffects of High Frequency Irrigation on Irrigation Uniformity IIen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, E. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWegge, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSheedy, M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Cooperative Extensionen_US
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractAnother year of data was collected to determine the effects of high frequency irrigation on irrigation uniformity in cotton production. A field located at the Marana Agricultural Center was split into two treatments. Treatment one was irrigated at approximately 35% depletion of available water in the plant rootzone. Treatment two was irrigated at approximately 65% depletion in the crop rootzone. Increased frequency of irrigation has shown improved yields in many cotton studies. However, these more frequent and lighter irrigation applications may cause problems with irrigation uniformity. Frequent rains during critical time periods made it difficult to ascertain the impact of the irrigation schedule on uniformity. However, the less frequent, heavier application rate did result in a more uniform irrigation.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectIrrigationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/197490-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1170en_US
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