Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/197452
Title:
The New U. S. - China Trade Agreement and Arizona Cotton
Author:
Ayer, Harry; Frizvold, George
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Gaining greater access to export markets, particularly Asian markets, is important to Arizona cotton producers. Over 80 percent of Arizona’s cotton shipments are exports, roughly double the U.S. average. Asian countries typically account for half of world cotton imports. Relative to the rest of the United States, Arizona (along with California) has a location advantage supplying these markets. In November 1999 the United States and China signed a trade agreement to reduce China’s trade barriers and win U.S. support for China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO). According to recent USDA projections, the agreement would increase China’s net cotton imports by $359 million when fully implemented in 2005 and by $328 million per year between 2000-09. Political uncertainty surrounds the timing of China’s accession to the WTO, however, and China’s return to cotton net-importer status could be delayed by Chinese policies to draw down their large accumulation of cotton stocks.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Economics
Series/Report no.:
AZ1170

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleThe New U. S. - China Trade Agreement and Arizona Cottonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAyer, Harryen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrizvold, Georgeen_US
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractGaining greater access to export markets, particularly Asian markets, is important to Arizona cotton producers. Over 80 percent of Arizona’s cotton shipments are exports, roughly double the U.S. average. Asian countries typically account for half of world cotton imports. Relative to the rest of the United States, Arizona (along with California) has a location advantage supplying these markets. In November 1999 the United States and China signed a trade agreement to reduce China’s trade barriers and win U.S. support for China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO). According to recent USDA projections, the agreement would increase China’s net cotton imports by $359 million when fully implemented in 2005 and by $328 million per year between 2000-09. Political uncertainty surrounds the timing of China’s accession to the WTO, however, and China’s return to cotton net-importer status could be delayed by Chinese policies to draw down their large accumulation of cotton stocks.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/197452-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1170en_US
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