Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196233
Title:
Renegotiating the Interface Between the Built and Natural Environments
Author:
Johnson, Nicholas
Issue Date:
2011-11-04
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. 
Collection Information:
This item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
As human consumption and energy production continue to negatively a ect our environment, a re-conceptualization of our relationship to the wider world becomes a necessary step in the coexistence of humankind and nature. Modern methods of building have sought to establish a universal conception of human comfort that is disconnected from the realities of the speci c and varied climates in which we live. The building envelope is seen as a barrier to nature, a fortress where we have complete control over the parameters of our environment. This degree of control ultimately requires an unlimited source of energy. Through development of emerging material systems and technological integration, this project seeks to create a dialog between interior and exterior environments, recognizing that the two should be connected. This re-envisioned interface responds directly to changing environmental conditions through formal and material adaptations which create a symbiotic relationship between the built and natural worlds
Description:
Winner, Katheryne B. Willock Library Research Award, 2011
Additional Links:
http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/handle/10150/203819

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Nicholasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-06T23:35:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-12-06T23:35:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/196233-
dc.descriptionWinner, Katheryne B. Willock Library Research Award, 2011en_US
dc.description.abstractAs human consumption and energy production continue to negatively a ect our environment, a re-conceptualization of our relationship to the wider world becomes a necessary step in the coexistence of humankind and nature. Modern methods of building have sought to establish a universal conception of human comfort that is disconnected from the realities of the speci c and varied climates in which we live. The building envelope is seen as a barrier to nature, a fortress where we have complete control over the parameters of our environment. This degree of control ultimately requires an unlimited source of energy. Through development of emerging material systems and technological integration, this project seeks to create a dialog between interior and exterior environments, recognizing that the two should be connected. This re-envisioned interface responds directly to changing environmental conditions through formal and material adaptations which create a symbiotic relationship between the built and natural worldsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/handle/10150/203819-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. -
dc.titleRenegotiating the Interface Between the Built and Natural Environmentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.en_US
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