Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196146
Title:
A New Approach for Turbulent Simulations in Complex Geometries
Author:
Israel, Daniel Morris
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Historically turbulence modeling has been sharply divided into Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), in which all the turbulent scales of motion are modeled, and large-eddy simulation (LES), in which only a portion of the turbulent spectrum is modeled. In recent years there have been numerous attempts to couple these two approaches either by patching RANS and LES calculations together (zonal methods) or by blending the two sets of equations. In order to create a proper bridging model, that is, a single set of equations which captures both RANS and LES like behavior, it is necessary to place both RANS and LES in a more general framework.The goal of the current work is threefold: to provide such a framework, to demonstrate how the Flow Simulation Methodology (FSM) fits into this framework, and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the current version of the FSM. To do this, first a set of filtered Navier-Stokes (FNS) equations are introduced in terms of an arbitrary generalized filter. Additional exact equations are given for the second order moments and the generalized subfilted dissipation rate tensor. This is followed by a discussion of the role of implicit and explicit filters in turbulence modeling.The FSM is then described with particular attention to its role as a bridging model. In order to evaluate the method a specific implementation of the FSM approach is proposed. Simulations are presented using this model for the case of separating flow over a "hump" with and without flow control. Careful attention is paid to error estimation, and, in particular, how using flow statistics and time series affects the error analysis. Both mean flow and Reynolds stress profiles are presented, as well as the phase averaged turbulent structures and wall pressure spectra. Using the phase averaged data it is possible to examine how the FSM partitions the energy between the coherent resolved scale motions, the random resolved scale fluctuations, and the subfilter quantities.The method proves to be qualitatively successful at reproducing large turbulent structures. However, like other hybrid methods, it has difficulty in the region where the model behavior transitions from RANS to LES> Consequently the phase averaged structures reproduce the experiments quite well, and the forcing does significantly reduce the length of the separated region. Nevertheless, the recirculation length is signficantly too large for all cases.Overall the current results demonstrate the promise of bridging models in general and the FSM in particular. However, current bridging techniques are still in their infancy. There is still important progress to be made and it is hoped that this work points out the more important avenues for exploration.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
turbulence modeling; hybrid models; numerical analysis; active flow control; bridging models
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fasel, Hermann
Committee Chair:
Fasel, Hermann

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleA New Approach for Turbulent Simulations in Complex Geometriesen_US
dc.creatorIsrael, Daniel Morrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorIsrael, Daniel Morrisen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHistorically turbulence modeling has been sharply divided into Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), in which all the turbulent scales of motion are modeled, and large-eddy simulation (LES), in which only a portion of the turbulent spectrum is modeled. In recent years there have been numerous attempts to couple these two approaches either by patching RANS and LES calculations together (zonal methods) or by blending the two sets of equations. In order to create a proper bridging model, that is, a single set of equations which captures both RANS and LES like behavior, it is necessary to place both RANS and LES in a more general framework.The goal of the current work is threefold: to provide such a framework, to demonstrate how the Flow Simulation Methodology (FSM) fits into this framework, and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the current version of the FSM. To do this, first a set of filtered Navier-Stokes (FNS) equations are introduced in terms of an arbitrary generalized filter. Additional exact equations are given for the second order moments and the generalized subfilted dissipation rate tensor. This is followed by a discussion of the role of implicit and explicit filters in turbulence modeling.The FSM is then described with particular attention to its role as a bridging model. In order to evaluate the method a specific implementation of the FSM approach is proposed. Simulations are presented using this model for the case of separating flow over a "hump" with and without flow control. Careful attention is paid to error estimation, and, in particular, how using flow statistics and time series affects the error analysis. Both mean flow and Reynolds stress profiles are presented, as well as the phase averaged turbulent structures and wall pressure spectra. Using the phase averaged data it is possible to examine how the FSM partitions the energy between the coherent resolved scale motions, the random resolved scale fluctuations, and the subfilter quantities.The method proves to be qualitatively successful at reproducing large turbulent structures. However, like other hybrid methods, it has difficulty in the region where the model behavior transitions from RANS to LES> Consequently the phase averaged structures reproduce the experiments quite well, and the forcing does significantly reduce the length of the separated region. Nevertheless, the recirculation length is signficantly too large for all cases.Overall the current results demonstrate the promise of bridging models in general and the FSM in particular. However, current bridging techniques are still in their infancy. There is still important progress to be made and it is hoped that this work points out the more important avenues for exploration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectturbulence modelingen_US
dc.subjecthybrid modelsen_US
dc.subjectnumerical analysisen_US
dc.subjectactive flow controlen_US
dc.subjectbridging modelsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFasel, Hermannen_US
dc.contributor.chairFasel, Hermannen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKerschen, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTumin, Anatolien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIndik, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1272en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354741en_US
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