Improvements to Flood Detection and Monitoring Through Satellite Autonomy, Sensor Webs and Hydrological Modeling

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196142
Title:
Improvements to Flood Detection and Monitoring Through Satellite Autonomy, Sensor Webs and Hydrological Modeling
Author:
Ip, Filipe
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is put together from a set of three journal papers. The first paper describes how satellite imagery and spacecraft autonomy are used to advance the field of near real-time detection, monitoring, and rapid response to flooding. The second paper describes the ground instrumentation of an artificial water recharge basin field site close to Tucson with a network of inter-connected sensors to study the transient process of repeated flooding in real-time, and the third paper describes an effort to link together multiple ground-based and space-based remote sensing assets to an integrated and coordinated monitoring system for floods. Collectively, the three papers describe new breakthroughs in the field of flood detection and monitoring through the use of satellite onboard automation and Sensorweb networks.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
flood detection; flood sensorweb; hydrological modeling; satellite autonomy; flood monitoring network; streamflow loss modeling
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gupta, Hoshin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleImprovements to Flood Detection and Monitoring Through Satellite Autonomy, Sensor Webs and Hydrological Modelingen_US
dc.creatorIp, Filipeen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, Filipeen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is put together from a set of three journal papers. The first paper describes how satellite imagery and spacecraft autonomy are used to advance the field of near real-time detection, monitoring, and rapid response to flooding. The second paper describes the ground instrumentation of an artificial water recharge basin field site close to Tucson with a network of inter-connected sensors to study the transient process of repeated flooding in real-time, and the third paper describes an effort to link together multiple ground-based and space-based remote sensing assets to an integrated and coordinated monitoring system for floods. Collectively, the three papers describe new breakthroughs in the field of flood detection and monitoring through the use of satellite onboard automation and Sensorweb networks.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectflood detectionen_US
dc.subjectflood sensorweben_US
dc.subjecthydrological modelingen_US
dc.subjectsatellite autonomyen_US
dc.subjectflood monitoring networken_US
dc.subjectstreamflow loss modelingen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGupta, Hoshinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuarten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1807en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747565en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.