Land Tenure Reforms and Social Transformation in Botswana: Implications for Urbanization.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196133
Title:
Land Tenure Reforms and Social Transformation in Botswana: Implications for Urbanization.
Author:
Ijagbemi, Bayo
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Land reforms, with the majority bordering on full scale revision of tenure rules have become a recurrent theme in the agenda of most African states since attaining political independence. For southern Africa, and a number of former colonies where the white settler populations acting in concert with the colonial administrations dispossessed the majority of the native populations of their land, the reforms have taken the form of restitution and redistribution of land. Unlike these types of reforms in southern African and because the Bechuanaland Protectorate was not a settler colony, Botswana has framed its land tenure and land use reforms with an eye on the problems associated with common property management. My dissertation evaluates the effects of Botswana's land reforms on social transformations in Kweneng District by carefully investigating their impacts on households' livelihood strategies, kinship ties, and social balance of power on one hand, and the implications of these transformations for urbanization on the other.While acknowledging the good intentions of the government as encapsulated in the objectives of the reform policies, it is my contention that several areas which were never taken into account during the formulation of these policies have been adversely impacted. Unfortunately, the unintended consequences have overshadowed the targeted ends of the reforms. These results are visible in the contemporary family and kinship structure, the chieftaincy institution, livelihood systems in livestock and arable agriculture, administration of justice, and the phenomenon of urbanization.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Land Tenure; Botswana; Kweneng; Social transformation; Urbanization.
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Park, Thomas
Committee Chair:
Park, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLand Tenure Reforms and Social Transformation in Botswana: Implications for Urbanization.en_US
dc.creatorIjagbemi, Bayoen_US
dc.contributor.authorIjagbemi, Bayoen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLand reforms, with the majority bordering on full scale revision of tenure rules have become a recurrent theme in the agenda of most African states since attaining political independence. For southern Africa, and a number of former colonies where the white settler populations acting in concert with the colonial administrations dispossessed the majority of the native populations of their land, the reforms have taken the form of restitution and redistribution of land. Unlike these types of reforms in southern African and because the Bechuanaland Protectorate was not a settler colony, Botswana has framed its land tenure and land use reforms with an eye on the problems associated with common property management. My dissertation evaluates the effects of Botswana's land reforms on social transformations in Kweneng District by carefully investigating their impacts on households' livelihood strategies, kinship ties, and social balance of power on one hand, and the implications of these transformations for urbanization on the other.While acknowledging the good intentions of the government as encapsulated in the objectives of the reform policies, it is my contention that several areas which were never taken into account during the formulation of these policies have been adversely impacted. Unfortunately, the unintended consequences have overshadowed the targeted ends of the reforms. These results are visible in the contemporary family and kinship structure, the chieftaincy institution, livelihood systems in livestock and arable agriculture, administration of justice, and the phenomenon of urbanization.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLand Tenureen_US
dc.subjectBotswanaen_US
dc.subjectKwenengen_US
dc.subjectSocial transformationen_US
dc.subjectUrbanization.en_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPark, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.chairPark, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKillick, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaro, Mamadouen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1972en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746548en_US
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