Effect of Two Breeds and Two Dietary Concentrate Levels on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Merit, Tenderness parameters and fatty Acid Profiles

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196131
Title:
Effect of Two Breeds and Two Dietary Concentrate Levels on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Merit, Tenderness parameters and fatty Acid Profiles
Author:
Ibrahim, Rita M
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objectives of this study were to investigate the different characteristics of the newly introduced breed, Waguli (Wagyu x Tuli) when comparing it with the Brahman breed. Twenty-four animals were used. Six steers of each breed were fed 94% concentrate diet (94C) and the other six were fed 86% concentrate diet (86C). Eight steers, two from each group, each were harvested at 128 days, 142 days, and 156 days on feed. Feedlot performance data indicated that Waguli steers were highly efficient (P < 0.05) and gained more than Brahman steers on a daily basis (P < 0.05). Carcass characteristic data showed that Waguli steers have larger ribeye area with more 12th rib fat thickness, marbling score and higher quality grade (P < 0.05). It is well known that Wagyu is a highly marbled and tender Japanese breed. It was found that the reason for the Waguli tenderness and low shear force values to be the low level of calpastatin activity (P < 0.05), the inhibitor of the postmortem proteolytic enzyme-calpain. While the toughness of the Brahman meat was due to the high level of calpastatin activity. The calpain activity did not differ between the two breeds. Shear force values agreed with the calpain and calpastatin activities data, in which the Waguli steaks showed less shear force values at day 7 and 10 postmortem than the Brahman steaks (P < 0.05). However, at day 14 postmortem there was no difference in shear force values between the two breeds (P < 0.05). Fatty acid data analysis indicated that Waguli steers had a profile with less saturated fatty acids (SFA) and more unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) content than those in Brahman steers fat. Looking at the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) to saturated fatty acids (SFA), it is observed that Waguli steers had a greater ratio than Brahman steers. In conclusion, Waguli steers produce tender meat with good marbling ability, which likely to satisfy the consumers demand. In addition, they have a desirable average daily gain and feed efficiency with high polyunsaturated fatty acids comparatively with Brahman steers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Waguli; Brahman; tenderness; carcass merit; fatty acids
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Animal Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Marchello, John A

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEffect of Two Breeds and Two Dietary Concentrate Levels on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Merit, Tenderness parameters and fatty Acid Profilesen_US
dc.creatorIbrahim, Rita Men_US
dc.contributor.authorIbrahim, Rita Men_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to investigate the different characteristics of the newly introduced breed, Waguli (Wagyu x Tuli) when comparing it with the Brahman breed. Twenty-four animals were used. Six steers of each breed were fed 94% concentrate diet (94C) and the other six were fed 86% concentrate diet (86C). Eight steers, two from each group, each were harvested at 128 days, 142 days, and 156 days on feed. Feedlot performance data indicated that Waguli steers were highly efficient (P < 0.05) and gained more than Brahman steers on a daily basis (P < 0.05). Carcass characteristic data showed that Waguli steers have larger ribeye area with more 12th rib fat thickness, marbling score and higher quality grade (P < 0.05). It is well known that Wagyu is a highly marbled and tender Japanese breed. It was found that the reason for the Waguli tenderness and low shear force values to be the low level of calpastatin activity (P < 0.05), the inhibitor of the postmortem proteolytic enzyme-calpain. While the toughness of the Brahman meat was due to the high level of calpastatin activity. The calpain activity did not differ between the two breeds. Shear force values agreed with the calpain and calpastatin activities data, in which the Waguli steaks showed less shear force values at day 7 and 10 postmortem than the Brahman steaks (P < 0.05). However, at day 14 postmortem there was no difference in shear force values between the two breeds (P < 0.05). Fatty acid data analysis indicated that Waguli steers had a profile with less saturated fatty acids (SFA) and more unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) content than those in Brahman steers fat. Looking at the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) to saturated fatty acids (SFA), it is observed that Waguli steers had a greater ratio than Brahman steers. In conclusion, Waguli steers produce tender meat with good marbling ability, which likely to satisfy the consumers demand. In addition, they have a desirable average daily gain and feed efficiency with high polyunsaturated fatty acids comparatively with Brahman steers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectWagulien_US
dc.subjectBrahmanen_US
dc.subjecttendernessen_US
dc.subjectcarcass meriten_US
dc.subjectfatty acidsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMarchello, John Aen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarchello, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoll, Darrell E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDuff, Glenn C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaumgard, L. H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarchello, E. V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2385en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748276en_US
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