ELEMENTS OF JAZZ STYLE IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN ORGAN WORKS: SELECTED WORKS OF CHARLES IVES, WILLIAM ALBRIGHT, AND WILLIAM BOLCOM

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196128
Title:
ELEMENTS OF JAZZ STYLE IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN ORGAN WORKS: SELECTED WORKS OF CHARLES IVES, WILLIAM ALBRIGHT, AND WILLIAM BOLCOM
Author:
Hwang, Mi Kyung
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Jazz is a distinctive stylistic influence in twentieth-century American organ music. Organ music in the United States during this period may be classified into four diverse categories: German-influenced; French-influenced; program music; and new styles that include twentieth-century techniques, such as serialism, chance (aleatoric), atonality, and jazz. The organ is an ideal instrument for jazz performance since the organ can provide diverse timbres, such as reeds (clarinets, trumpets, and trombones), strings (violin, viola, and cello), and overtone-rich sounds from mutations and mixtures.This document presents an analysis of jazz elements in twentieth-century American organ works, especially focused on the following selected organ works: Charles Ives' Variations on "America" (1891), William Albright's Sweet Sixteenths: Concert Rag for Organ (1975), and William Bolcom's Sometimes I Feel, and Free Fantasia on "O Zion Haste" and "How Firm a Foundation" from Gospel Preludes, Book IV (1984). The first chapter introduces jazz, including its definition, historical background, and styles. The next four chapters discuss brief biographical material, musical styles, compositions of each composer, and comprehensive musical analysis of their selected organ works, including form, melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, and registration.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
AMERICAN; CHARLES IVES; JAZZ; ORGAN; WILLIAM ALBRIGHT; WILLIAM BOLCOM
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Decker, Pamela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleELEMENTS OF JAZZ STYLE IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN ORGAN WORKS: SELECTED WORKS OF CHARLES IVES, WILLIAM ALBRIGHT, AND WILLIAM BOLCOMen_US
dc.creatorHwang, Mi Kyungen_US
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Mi Kyungen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractJazz is a distinctive stylistic influence in twentieth-century American organ music. Organ music in the United States during this period may be classified into four diverse categories: German-influenced; French-influenced; program music; and new styles that include twentieth-century techniques, such as serialism, chance (aleatoric), atonality, and jazz. The organ is an ideal instrument for jazz performance since the organ can provide diverse timbres, such as reeds (clarinets, trumpets, and trombones), strings (violin, viola, and cello), and overtone-rich sounds from mutations and mixtures.This document presents an analysis of jazz elements in twentieth-century American organ works, especially focused on the following selected organ works: Charles Ives' Variations on "America" (1891), William Albright's Sweet Sixteenths: Concert Rag for Organ (1975), and William Bolcom's Sometimes I Feel, and Free Fantasia on "O Zion Haste" and "How Firm a Foundation" from Gospel Preludes, Book IV (1984). The first chapter introduces jazz, including its definition, historical background, and styles. The next four chapters discuss brief biographical material, musical styles, compositions of each composer, and comprehensive musical analysis of their selected organ works, including form, melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, and registration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAMERICANen_US
dc.subjectCHARLES IVESen_US
dc.subjectJAZZen_US
dc.subjectORGANen_US
dc.subjectWILLIAM ALBRIGHTen_US
dc.subjectWILLIAM BOLCOMen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDecker, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibson, Tannisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAllister, Peteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest10291en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752112en_US
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