Academic Capitalism, Organizational Change, and Student Workers: A Case Study of an Organized Research Unit in a Public Research University

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196127
Title:
Academic Capitalism, Organizational Change, and Student Workers: A Case Study of an Organized Research Unit in a Public Research University
Author:
Hutchinson, Barbara Swing
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This multi-layered case study examines the evolution and operations of one long-lived organized research unit (ORU), the Office of Arid Lands Studies (OALS), at the University of Arizona (UA). The first part includes a history of arid lands research at the UA and the beginning of OALS, a review of the Office's extramural and internal funding since 1964, and a comparison of that data and other performance indicators with other ORUs and, to some extent, with departments. The results are examined in relation to U.S. science policy and the theory of academic capitalism. The second part explores the causes of OALS' 1981 administrative move from the Vice President for Research Office to the College of Agriculture in the context of the University's multiple cultures and institutional and resource dependence theories of organizational change. The final part considers the influence of student workers on faculty supervisors who work as technicians in an OALS lab, and the role of funding agencies in the lab's operations. Theories of power and technology in the workplace provide a frame for the discussion. Findings suggest the placement of this ORU in a college has been beneficial in clarifying research turf, minimizing conflicts, supporting instruction, and in terms of funding. OALS' extramural support has averaged more than four dollars to every one dollar received internally, and OALS faculty compare favorably with other faculty in numbers of publications, and to a certain extent with teaching and advising. While the OALS remote sensing lab does utilize students as sources of cheap labor, the students do have considerable influence over how the lab operates. The only areas of conflict occurred over linking thesis topics to research projects and in meeting funding agency deadlines.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
academic capitalism; science policy; leadership; power; entrepreneurial
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary D.
Committee Chair:
Rhoades, Gary D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAcademic Capitalism, Organizational Change, and Student Workers: A Case Study of an Organized Research Unit in a Public Research Universityen_US
dc.creatorHutchinson, Barbara Swingen_US
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Barbara Swingen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis multi-layered case study examines the evolution and operations of one long-lived organized research unit (ORU), the Office of Arid Lands Studies (OALS), at the University of Arizona (UA). The first part includes a history of arid lands research at the UA and the beginning of OALS, a review of the Office's extramural and internal funding since 1964, and a comparison of that data and other performance indicators with other ORUs and, to some extent, with departments. The results are examined in relation to U.S. science policy and the theory of academic capitalism. The second part explores the causes of OALS' 1981 administrative move from the Vice President for Research Office to the College of Agriculture in the context of the University's multiple cultures and institutional and resource dependence theories of organizational change. The final part considers the influence of student workers on faculty supervisors who work as technicians in an OALS lab, and the role of funding agencies in the lab's operations. Theories of power and technology in the workplace provide a frame for the discussion. Findings suggest the placement of this ORU in a college has been beneficial in clarifying research turf, minimizing conflicts, supporting instruction, and in terms of funding. OALS' extramural support has averaged more than four dollars to every one dollar received internally, and OALS faculty compare favorably with other faculty in numbers of publications, and to a certain extent with teaching and advising. While the OALS remote sensing lab does utilize students as sources of cheap labor, the students do have considerable influence over how the lab operates. The only areas of conflict occurred over linking thesis topics to research projects and in meeting funding agency deadlines.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectacademic capitalismen_US
dc.subjectscience policyen_US
dc.subjectleadershipen_US
dc.subjectpoweren_US
dc.subjectentrepreneurialen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKnight, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberElliot, Jacken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1064en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137353775en_US
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