Institutional Positioning in Growth States: Influencers and Strategies of Enrollment Managers at Public Research Universities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196116
Title:
Institutional Positioning in Growth States: Influencers and Strategies of Enrollment Managers at Public Research Universities
Author:
Humphrey, Keith Bonhard
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Enrollment management practices, principles, and administrative structure are changing the behavior of the contemporary university. Through an examination of public Carnegie Research Intensive and Extensive universities in states anticipating growth in the high school graduate population, the study seeks to provide a greater understanding of enrollment management. The theoretical lenses of institutional theory (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983), resource dependence (Tolbert, 1985), and academic capitalism (Slaughter & Leslie, 1997; Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004), are employed to develop a new view of administrative behavior in current enrollment management organizations. In depth interviews with the individuals leading enrollment efforts at selected universities identify the enrollment manager as an administrator, educator, and entrepreneur. These individuals operate in complex political environments balancing their personal educational philosophies with the needs of their universities. Comprehensive reviews of the strategic enrollment plans at study universities reveal three main goals across all institutions: maintaining financial stability, increasing student and institutional quality, and increasing student diversity. Administrative behavior shows that all three goals are not treated equally and that revenue enhancement activities are prioritized. The administrative behaviors detailed in this study suggest a new ideology related to revenue enhancement for public higher education in the United States.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
administration; enrollment management; access; resource dependence; academic capitalism
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Doug
Committee Chair:
Woodard, Jr., Dudley B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleInstitutional Positioning in Growth States: Influencers and Strategies of Enrollment Managers at Public Research Universitiesen_US
dc.creatorHumphrey, Keith Bonharden_US
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, Keith Bonharden_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEnrollment management practices, principles, and administrative structure are changing the behavior of the contemporary university. Through an examination of public Carnegie Research Intensive and Extensive universities in states anticipating growth in the high school graduate population, the study seeks to provide a greater understanding of enrollment management. The theoretical lenses of institutional theory (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983), resource dependence (Tolbert, 1985), and academic capitalism (Slaughter & Leslie, 1997; Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004), are employed to develop a new view of administrative behavior in current enrollment management organizations. In depth interviews with the individuals leading enrollment efforts at selected universities identify the enrollment manager as an administrator, educator, and entrepreneur. These individuals operate in complex political environments balancing their personal educational philosophies with the needs of their universities. Comprehensive reviews of the strategic enrollment plans at study universities reveal three main goals across all institutions: maintaining financial stability, increasing student and institutional quality, and increasing student diversity. Administrative behavior shows that all three goals are not treated equally and that revenue enhancement activities are prioritized. The administrative behaviors detailed in this study suggest a new ideology related to revenue enhancement for public higher education in the United States.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadministrationen_US
dc.subjectenrollment managementen_US
dc.subjectaccessen_US
dc.subjectresource dependenceen_US
dc.subjectacademic capitalismen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dougen_US
dc.contributor.chairWoodard, Jr., Dudley B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoodard, Jr., Dudley B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCheslock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1355en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355208en_US
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