DATA MINING OF PEPTIDE MS/MS SPECTRA TO ELUCIDATE GAS-PHASE PEPTIDE DISSOCIATION MECHANISMS AND IMPROVE PROTEIN IDENTIFICATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196107
Title:
DATA MINING OF PEPTIDE MS/MS SPECTRA TO ELUCIDATE GAS-PHASE PEPTIDE DISSOCIATION MECHANISMS AND IMPROVE PROTEIN IDENTIFICATION
Author:
Huang, Yingying
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mining of datasets obtained from proteomics experiments was performed to investigate the dissociation pathways of protonated peptides activated in the gas phase under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). Intensity patterns in ion trap tandem mass spectra were exploited and different statistical approaches were employed to elucidate the dissociation mechanisms.Chapter 2 describes a study of 506 doubly-protonated tryptic peptides that shows the presence of an internal basic residue can increase the preferential fragmentation C-terminal to aspartic acid (Asp-Xxx) significantly. The degree of enhancement varies with the identity of the basic residues. The result corroborates a previously published mechanism based on studies from model peptides, and was incorporated into an existing peptide sequencing algorithm. A preliminary test on a separate dataset of 119 spectra shows that implementing rules to predict enhanced cleavages at Asp-Xxx improves the ability of the algorithm to identify the correct sequence from a list of candidates.Chapters 3-4 describe much more elaborate analyses on 28,330 peptides of different sequences and charge states. Extensive sorting based on prior knowledge was first performed to probe the correlation of fragmentation patterns with structural features. Pair-wise fragmentation maps reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns among singly-protonated tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of two or more protonated forms (proton partially-mobile) exist for Lys-ending peptides. Asp/Glu-Xxx dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton(s) and Xxx-Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton(s). When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton(s), cleavage at each peptide bond becomes more prominent. A fundamental dependence of gas phase peptide fragmentation on conformational constraints was found.A knowledge mining scheme was proposed in Chapter 5 to bypass the prior knowledge constraints and cluster the dissociation behaviors of 28,330 peptides into four distinct categories. The most influential factors in the fragmentation process are: the mobility of the proton(s), the presence and the location of Pro and Arg. Structural motifs responsible for each dissociation behavior are also elucidated.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
peptide; MS/MS; collision-induced dissociation; data mining; proteomics; fragmentation patterns
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wysocki, Vicki H.
Committee Chair:
Wysocki, Vicki H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDATA MINING OF PEPTIDE MS/MS SPECTRA TO ELUCIDATE GAS-PHASE PEPTIDE DISSOCIATION MECHANISMS AND IMPROVE PROTEIN IDENTIFICATIONen_US
dc.creatorHuang, Yingyingen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yingyingen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMining of datasets obtained from proteomics experiments was performed to investigate the dissociation pathways of protonated peptides activated in the gas phase under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). Intensity patterns in ion trap tandem mass spectra were exploited and different statistical approaches were employed to elucidate the dissociation mechanisms.Chapter 2 describes a study of 506 doubly-protonated tryptic peptides that shows the presence of an internal basic residue can increase the preferential fragmentation C-terminal to aspartic acid (Asp-Xxx) significantly. The degree of enhancement varies with the identity of the basic residues. The result corroborates a previously published mechanism based on studies from model peptides, and was incorporated into an existing peptide sequencing algorithm. A preliminary test on a separate dataset of 119 spectra shows that implementing rules to predict enhanced cleavages at Asp-Xxx improves the ability of the algorithm to identify the correct sequence from a list of candidates.Chapters 3-4 describe much more elaborate analyses on 28,330 peptides of different sequences and charge states. Extensive sorting based on prior knowledge was first performed to probe the correlation of fragmentation patterns with structural features. Pair-wise fragmentation maps reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns among singly-protonated tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of two or more protonated forms (proton partially-mobile) exist for Lys-ending peptides. Asp/Glu-Xxx dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton(s) and Xxx-Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton(s). When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton(s), cleavage at each peptide bond becomes more prominent. A fundamental dependence of gas phase peptide fragmentation on conformational constraints was found.A knowledge mining scheme was proposed in Chapter 5 to bypass the prior knowledge constraints and cluster the dissociation behaviors of 28,330 peptides into four distinct categories. The most influential factors in the fragmentation process are: the mobility of the proton(s), the presence and the location of Pro and Arg. Structural motifs responsible for each dissociation behavior are also elucidated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectpeptideen_US
dc.subjectMS/MSen_US
dc.subjectcollision-induced dissociationen_US
dc.subjectdata miningen_US
dc.subjectproteomicsen_US
dc.subjectfragmentation patternsen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWysocki, Vicki H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHruby, Victor J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Indraneel P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1133en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354128en_US
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