Stress, Symptom, Symptom Distress, and Symptom Self-Management in Localized Prostate Cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196100
Title:
Stress, Symptom, Symptom Distress, and Symptom Self-Management in Localized Prostate Cancer
Author:
Hsiao, Chao-Pin
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of death in American men. Patients with localized prostate cancer may experience unique and multidimensional symptoms that are distressful from treatment and thereafter. This cross-sectional correlational study aimed to investigate the relationships among stress, symptoms, symptom distress, and symptom self-management and identify the effective strategies of symptom self-management in men with localized prostate cancer following prostatectomy or radiation therapy.Eight saliva samples and 3 questionnaires (Perceived Stress Scale, Symptom Indexes, and Strategy and Effectiveness of Symptom Self-Management) were obtained from each participant between 1 and 3 months following their first prostate cancer treatment. The sample consisted of 53 men with localized prostate cancer. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations for the entire sample ranged from 0.3 to 0.08 ug/dL. Cortisol was secreted in a circadian rhythm with heightened activity in the early morning and lowered activity late in the day. The circadian pattern of cortisol secretion was similar in both the prostatectomy and radiation therapy groups, although the values were slightly different. Two areas Under the Curve (AUC) of salivary cortisol were calculated. Three cortisol circadian rhythms were identified, but the majority of the sample had a typical negative consistent circadian rhythm.Patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy had low perceived stress. Perceived stress was positively correlated with AUCg, noon salivary cortisol concentrations, and afternoon salivary cortisol concentrations. Subjects reported a moderate degree of symptoms and symptom distress on urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction 1-3 months following treatments. The most effective strategies of urinary symptom management were pad and kegel exercise; the most effective strategy of bowel symptom management was rest or endure; the most effective strategies of sexual dysfunction management included express their feelings or find alternative ways to express their affection. The symptom self-management strategies were significantly and positively correlated with symptom self-management effectiveness.Symptom distress and AUCg were significant and strong predictors of symptom self-management. Findings can help health care providers develop effective strategies for symptom self-management that enhance health related quality of life among men with localized prostate cancer.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Prostate cancer; Salivary cortisol; Stress; Symptom; Symptom Distress; Symptom management
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Moore, Ida M. (Ki)
Committee Chair:
Moore, Ida M. (Ki)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStress, Symptom, Symptom Distress, and Symptom Self-Management in Localized Prostate Canceren_US
dc.creatorHsiao, Chao-Pinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, Chao-Pinen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractProstate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of death in American men. Patients with localized prostate cancer may experience unique and multidimensional symptoms that are distressful from treatment and thereafter. This cross-sectional correlational study aimed to investigate the relationships among stress, symptoms, symptom distress, and symptom self-management and identify the effective strategies of symptom self-management in men with localized prostate cancer following prostatectomy or radiation therapy.Eight saliva samples and 3 questionnaires (Perceived Stress Scale, Symptom Indexes, and Strategy and Effectiveness of Symptom Self-Management) were obtained from each participant between 1 and 3 months following their first prostate cancer treatment. The sample consisted of 53 men with localized prostate cancer. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations for the entire sample ranged from 0.3 to 0.08 ug/dL. Cortisol was secreted in a circadian rhythm with heightened activity in the early morning and lowered activity late in the day. The circadian pattern of cortisol secretion was similar in both the prostatectomy and radiation therapy groups, although the values were slightly different. Two areas Under the Curve (AUC) of salivary cortisol were calculated. Three cortisol circadian rhythms were identified, but the majority of the sample had a typical negative consistent circadian rhythm.Patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy had low perceived stress. Perceived stress was positively correlated with AUCg, noon salivary cortisol concentrations, and afternoon salivary cortisol concentrations. Subjects reported a moderate degree of symptoms and symptom distress on urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction 1-3 months following treatments. The most effective strategies of urinary symptom management were pad and kegel exercise; the most effective strategy of bowel symptom management was rest or endure; the most effective strategies of sexual dysfunction management included express their feelings or find alternative ways to express their affection. The symptom self-management strategies were significantly and positively correlated with symptom self-management effectiveness.Symptom distress and AUCg were significant and strong predictors of symptom self-management. Findings can help health care providers develop effective strategies for symptom self-management that enhance health related quality of life among men with localized prostate cancer.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectProstate canceren_US
dc.subjectSalivary cortisolen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subjectSymptomen_US
dc.subjectSymptom Distressen_US
dc.subjectSymptom managementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Ida M. (Ki)en_US
dc.contributor.chairMoore, Ida M. (Ki)en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleen C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMerkle, Carrieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10080en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750496en_US
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