Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196085
Title:
The Early Detection of Depression from Social Networking Sites
Author:
Holleran, Shannon
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Depression has a high prevalence among college students. Because it is a highly private (i.e. experiential) and socially stigmatized mental illness, it often goes undetected in daily life. The basic research question behind this line of research is how students' postings on their social networking websites can be used for the early detection of depression. The current research investigates how well depression can be gauged from MySpace profiles (Study 1) and Facebook profiles (Study 2 & Study 3). Across studies, the results reveal that depression can be assessed with a moderate degree of accuracy. In addition, Study 3 presents evidence that viewing "mini-blogs" allows for similar levels of accuracy compared to viewing an entire profile and the degree to which a person is Extraverted or censors information about themselves (e.g. Impression Management, Public Self-Consciousness) influences the degree of accuracy. Overall, the results speak to the idea that social networking sites can be a cost effective and clinically relevant tool to detecting depression.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
accuracy of first impressions; depression; Facebook; MySpace; social networking sites
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mehl, Matthias
Committee Chair:
Mehl, Matthias

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Early Detection of Depression from Social Networking Sitesen_US
dc.creatorHolleran, Shannonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolleran, Shannonen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDepression has a high prevalence among college students. Because it is a highly private (i.e. experiential) and socially stigmatized mental illness, it often goes undetected in daily life. The basic research question behind this line of research is how students' postings on their social networking websites can be used for the early detection of depression. The current research investigates how well depression can be gauged from MySpace profiles (Study 1) and Facebook profiles (Study 2 & Study 3). Across studies, the results reveal that depression can be assessed with a moderate degree of accuracy. In addition, Study 3 presents evidence that viewing "mini-blogs" allows for similar levels of accuracy compared to viewing an entire profile and the degree to which a person is Extraverted or censors information about themselves (e.g. Impression Management, Public Self-Consciousness) influences the degree of accuracy. Overall, the results speak to the idea that social networking sites can be a cost effective and clinically relevant tool to detecting depression.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaccuracy of first impressionsen_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjectFacebooken_US
dc.subjectMySpaceen_US
dc.subjectsocial networking sitesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.chairMehl, Matthiasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStone, Jeffen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10847en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753738en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.