Stories That Matter: Native American Fifth Graders' Responses to Culturally Authentic Text

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196078
Title:
Stories That Matter: Native American Fifth Graders' Responses to Culturally Authentic Text
Author:
Hoffman, Angeline Pearl
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
AbstractThe purpose of this study is to examine textual features in Native American children's literature and Native children's responses to these textual features. Culturally authentic children's literature was used to gain insights into children's perspectives as they engaged in responses within literature circles.This study utilized qualitative research methods and ethnographic techniques. This study draws on two complementary frames: the theorization of culturally authentic Native American children's literature and reader response theory. The study focused on two goals: first, to make explicit decisions about how to depict reoccurring themes, languages, and discourses of culture; second, to acknowledge a reader's ability to draw from a knowledge base of experiences available to members of a particular cultural community while interpreting literature. The students participated in fourteen literature discussions of culturally authentic literature. Data collection included transcripts from literature discussions, interviews, observational field notes, and written artifacts. Categories were constructed through inductive analysis of data.My three research questions were derived from Rosenblatt and reader response theory, including Native American perspectives:1. What Native American textual features are identifiable in fourteen Native American children's books?2. What types of talk about that these textual features do children engage in through literature circles of Native American children's literature?3. What are children's perspectives about reading and discussing Native American children's literature?The findings of this study contribute to teacher education programs, Indigenous education, and the field of Native children's literature. Furthermore, these cultural literatures provide and maintain Native American stories while promoting literacy for all children.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Authentic; Matter; Native American; Responses; Stories; Text
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading & Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.
Committee Chair:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStories That Matter: Native American Fifth Graders' Responses to Culturally Authentic Texten_US
dc.creatorHoffman, Angeline Pearlen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Angeline Pearlen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAbstractThe purpose of this study is to examine textual features in Native American children's literature and Native children's responses to these textual features. Culturally authentic children's literature was used to gain insights into children's perspectives as they engaged in responses within literature circles.This study utilized qualitative research methods and ethnographic techniques. This study draws on two complementary frames: the theorization of culturally authentic Native American children's literature and reader response theory. The study focused on two goals: first, to make explicit decisions about how to depict reoccurring themes, languages, and discourses of culture; second, to acknowledge a reader's ability to draw from a knowledge base of experiences available to members of a particular cultural community while interpreting literature. The students participated in fourteen literature discussions of culturally authentic literature. Data collection included transcripts from literature discussions, interviews, observational field notes, and written artifacts. Categories were constructed through inductive analysis of data.My three research questions were derived from Rosenblatt and reader response theory, including Native American perspectives:1. What Native American textual features are identifiable in fourteen Native American children's books?2. What types of talk about that these textual features do children engage in through literature circles of Native American children's literature?3. What are children's perspectives about reading and discussing Native American children's literature?The findings of this study contribute to teacher education programs, Indigenous education, and the field of Native children's literature. Furthermore, these cultural literatures provide and maintain Native American stories while promoting literacy for all children.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectAuthenticen_US
dc.subjectMatteren_US
dc.subjectNative Americanen_US
dc.subjectResponsesen_US
dc.subjectStoriesen_US
dc.subjectTexten_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarty, Teresa L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZepeda, Ofeliaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11231en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261100en_US
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