Feeling Good in Spite of Failure: Understanding Race-Based Differences in Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196070
Title:
Feeling Good in Spite of Failure: Understanding Race-Based Differences in Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem
Author:
Auf der Heide, Laura
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Studies indicate that global self-esteem, an individual's overall sense of self-worth, and academic self-esteem, self-worth related to academics, are positively related to academic achievement. This relationship holds for white adolescents. However, while still positive, this relationship is weaker for African Americans, who have high global and academic self-esteem, but very low academic achievement. Patterns for Mexican Americans are less clear, but their global and academic self-esteem appear to fall between the range for white and African American adolescents, while their academic achievement is similar to that of African Americans. To address this, I construct Combinatoric Identity Theory (CIT), a symbolic interactionist theory that incorporates the importance of racial/ethnic and student identities into our current understandings of self-esteem and achievement. I then apply CIT to data collected on Mexican American and white tenth-graders.After a discussion of the relevant literature on education, self-esteem, and identity, I discuss my data collection strategy and techniques. This is followed by empirical analysis. Results indicate that identity processes do affect self-esteem, and that they operate in similar ways for Mexican American and white adolescents. Implications of these results and directions for future research are then presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
racial/ethnic identity; student identity; academic achievement; global self-esteem; academic self-esteem; Combinatoric Identity Theory
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walker, Henry A.
Committee Chair:
Walker, Henry A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFeeling Good in Spite of Failure: Understanding Race-Based Differences in Academic Achievement and Self-Esteemen_US
dc.creatorAuf der Heide, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorAuf der Heide, Lauraen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudies indicate that global self-esteem, an individual's overall sense of self-worth, and academic self-esteem, self-worth related to academics, are positively related to academic achievement. This relationship holds for white adolescents. However, while still positive, this relationship is weaker for African Americans, who have high global and academic self-esteem, but very low academic achievement. Patterns for Mexican Americans are less clear, but their global and academic self-esteem appear to fall between the range for white and African American adolescents, while their academic achievement is similar to that of African Americans. To address this, I construct Combinatoric Identity Theory (CIT), a symbolic interactionist theory that incorporates the importance of racial/ethnic and student identities into our current understandings of self-esteem and achievement. I then apply CIT to data collected on Mexican American and white tenth-graders.After a discussion of the relevant literature on education, self-esteem, and identity, I discuss my data collection strategy and techniques. This is followed by empirical analysis. Results indicate that identity processes do affect self-esteem, and that they operate in similar ways for Mexican American and white adolescents. Implications of these results and directions for future research are then presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectracial/ethnic identityen_US
dc.subjectstudent identityen_US
dc.subjectacademic achievementen_US
dc.subjectglobal self-esteemen_US
dc.subjectacademic self-esteemen_US
dc.subjectCombinatoric Identity Theoryen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Henry A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWalker, Henry A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMolm, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeahey, Erinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2863en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749926en_US
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