Pilot Study of Patient and Oncologist Preferences for Chemotherapy Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196055
Title:
Pilot Study of Patient and Oncologist Preferences for Chemotherapy Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Cancer
Author:
Hess, Lisa M.
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer death among women in the United States, claiming the lives of more than 15,000 women each year. Women who receive this diagnosis must make rapid, critical medical decisions that impact survival and quality of life. Two studies were conducted to obtain pilot data related to the health preferences of ovarian cancer patients and their oncologists. Forty-one eligible patients and 34 eligible physicians participated in this study. Six hypothetical health states were developed based on possible outcomes of ovarian cancer treatment strategies. Participants were asked to rate these health states using a visual analog scale and the standard gamble chance board. A series of exploratory hypotheses were tested to obtain guidance for future research. Patients under surveillance had significantly lower preferences for all health states than patients receiving chemotherapy or physicians. Overall, patients were very consistent across health states with the level of risk they were willing to take, while physicians were significantly more likely to avoid risk when the treatment strategy presented involved improved treatment efficacy, even when associated with higher toxicity and poor emotional well being. These findings show the need for additional research and suggest that research in medical decision making must examine health choices made by patients separately, depending on their current treatment status, but not necessarily by current self-reported health status, time since diagnosis or by recurrent/non-recurrent disease.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
ovarian cancer; preferences; oncology; decision making; chemotherapy
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Pharmaceutical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Malone, Daniel
Committee Chair:
Malone, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePilot Study of Patient and Oncologist Preferences for Chemotherapy Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Canceren_US
dc.creatorHess, Lisa M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHess, Lisa M.en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOvarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer death among women in the United States, claiming the lives of more than 15,000 women each year. Women who receive this diagnosis must make rapid, critical medical decisions that impact survival and quality of life. Two studies were conducted to obtain pilot data related to the health preferences of ovarian cancer patients and their oncologists. Forty-one eligible patients and 34 eligible physicians participated in this study. Six hypothetical health states were developed based on possible outcomes of ovarian cancer treatment strategies. Participants were asked to rate these health states using a visual analog scale and the standard gamble chance board. A series of exploratory hypotheses were tested to obtain guidance for future research. Patients under surveillance had significantly lower preferences for all health states than patients receiving chemotherapy or physicians. Overall, patients were very consistent across health states with the level of risk they were willing to take, while physicians were significantly more likely to avoid risk when the treatment strategy presented involved improved treatment efficacy, even when associated with higher toxicity and poor emotional well being. These findings show the need for additional research and suggest that research in medical decision making must examine health choices made by patients separately, depending on their current treatment status, but not necessarily by current self-reported health status, time since diagnosis or by recurrent/non-recurrent disease.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectovarian canceren_US
dc.subjectpreferencesen_US
dc.subjectoncologyen_US
dc.subjectdecision makingen_US
dc.subjectchemotherapyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMalone, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.chairMalone, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSkrepnek, Granten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCoons, Stephen Joelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArmstrong, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamelaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2467en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748384en_US
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