Relationship Between Nearly-Coincident Spiking and Common Excitatory Synaptic Input in Motor Neurons

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196051
Title:
Relationship Between Nearly-Coincident Spiking and Common Excitatory Synaptic Input in Motor Neurons
Author:
Herrera-Valdez, Marco Arieli
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The activities of pairs of mammalian motor neurons (MNs) receiving varying degrees of common excitatory synaptic input were simulated to study the relationship between nearly-coincident spiking and common excitatory drive. The somatic membrane potential of each MN was modeled using a single compartment model. Each MN was modeled toreceive synaptic contacts from hundreds of pre-synaptic fibers. The percentage of pre-synaptic fibers that diverged to supply both MNs of a pair with common synaptic input could be varied from 0 (no common inputs) to 100% (all common inputs). Spikes trains on separate re-synaptic fibers were independent of one another and were modeled as realizations of renewal processes with mean firing rates (10 - 50Hz) resembling that associated with supra-spinal input. Maximum synaptic conductances and time constants were varied across synapsesto match experimentally observed somatic EPSPs. The number of active pre-synaptic fibers to each MN was adjusted in order that the firingrates of MNs were between 8 and 15 Hz. For each common input condition, 100 s of concurrent spiking activity of the MNs was usedto construct cross-correlation histograms. The sizes of the central peaks in the histograms were quantified using both the k' (Ellaway and Murthy 1985) and CIS (Nordstrom et al. 1992) indices ofsynchrony. Monotonically increasing linear relationships between the proportion of common synaptic input and the magnitude of synchronywere observed for both indices. For example, the model predicted that 10% common input would yield a CIS value of 0.27 whereas 100% commoninput would yield a CIS value of 1.5. These values are within the range of values observed experimentally. These results, therefore,provide a means to translate measures of nearly-coincident spiking into plausible renditions of synaptic connectivity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
coincidence and synchrony; cortico-spinal; motor neurons; single compartment; spike trains; synaptic input
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physiological Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fuglevand, Andrew J.
Committee Chair:
Fuglevand, Andrew J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleRelationship Between Nearly-Coincident Spiking and Common Excitatory Synaptic Input in Motor Neuronsen_US
dc.creatorHerrera-Valdez, Marco Arielien_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrera-Valdez, Marco Arielien_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe activities of pairs of mammalian motor neurons (MNs) receiving varying degrees of common excitatory synaptic input were simulated to study the relationship between nearly-coincident spiking and common excitatory drive. The somatic membrane potential of each MN was modeled using a single compartment model. Each MN was modeled toreceive synaptic contacts from hundreds of pre-synaptic fibers. The percentage of pre-synaptic fibers that diverged to supply both MNs of a pair with common synaptic input could be varied from 0 (no common inputs) to 100% (all common inputs). Spikes trains on separate re-synaptic fibers were independent of one another and were modeled as realizations of renewal processes with mean firing rates (10 - 50Hz) resembling that associated with supra-spinal input. Maximum synaptic conductances and time constants were varied across synapsesto match experimentally observed somatic EPSPs. The number of active pre-synaptic fibers to each MN was adjusted in order that the firingrates of MNs were between 8 and 15 Hz. For each common input condition, 100 s of concurrent spiking activity of the MNs was usedto construct cross-correlation histograms. The sizes of the central peaks in the histograms were quantified using both the k' (Ellaway and Murthy 1985) and CIS (Nordstrom et al. 1992) indices ofsynchrony. Monotonically increasing linear relationships between the proportion of common synaptic input and the magnitude of synchronywere observed for both indices. For example, the model predicted that 10% common input would yield a CIS value of 0.27 whereas 100% commoninput would yield a CIS value of 1.5. These values are within the range of values observed experimentally. These results, therefore,provide a means to translate measures of nearly-coincident spiking into plausible renditions of synaptic connectivity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcoincidence and synchronyen_US
dc.subjectcortico-spinalen_US
dc.subjectmotor neuronsen_US
dc.subjectsingle compartmenten_US
dc.subjectspike trainsen_US
dc.subjectsynaptic inputen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFuglevand, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairFuglevand, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFellous, Jean-Marcen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine, Richard B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10057en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750476en_US
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