Feeding of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with Different Diets Supplemented with Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria Extracts (Saponins)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196050
Title:
Feeding of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with Different Diets Supplemented with Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria Extracts (Saponins)
Author:
Hernandez-Acosta, Mario
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Yucca (Yucca schidigera) and Soapbark (Quillaja saponaria), both native desert plants, are major commercial sources of saponin extracts. Yucca schidigera is native to the southwestern United States and to the arid Mexican desert, and Quillaja saponaria is found in arid areas of Chile. Saponins have detergent or surfactant properties with both water-soluble and fat-soluble components.The use of natural saponins from yucca and soapbark as an additive in the diet, has improved production in aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of inclusion of Nutrafito plus (NTF+), which is a mixture of Yucca and Soapbark extracts, on growth, survival, and development of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and the effect on growth, survival, development, and digestive enzyme activities for juvenile Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.The extracts were included at different levels in the diets of tilapia and shrimp in four experiments. In experiment 1, at the end of 6 weeks there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between growth rates of tilapia fed 6 different diets, with no mortality nor abnormal behavior in any of the treatments. Water quality parameters were determined weekly and remained within recommended limits for Nile tilapia culture.In the second trial, at the end of 40 days, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between growth rates of fish fed 7 different diets with various levels of Nutrafito. There were no mortalities during the experiment.In the third trial, 20 tanks (140 L each) were stocked with 10 shrimp each. Tanks were divided into 5 treatments with 4 replicates each. There was significant difference (p < 0.05) between growth rates of shrimp fed 5 different diets, with higher growth rate at higher levels of inclusion.In the fourth trial, 15 tanks (140 L each) were stocked with 10 shrimp each. Tanks were divided into 5 treatments with 3 replicates each. There was significant difference between growth rates and feed conversion ratio of shrimp fed 5 different diets. In addition, an analysis for digestive enzymes activity was done and no significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between treatments.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
enzymes; extract; growth; Saponins; Shrimp; Tilapia
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin M.
Committee Chair:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFeeding of Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with Different Diets Supplemented with Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria Extracts (Saponins)en_US
dc.creatorHernandez-Acosta, Marioen_US
dc.contributor.authorHernandez-Acosta, Marioen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractYucca (Yucca schidigera) and Soapbark (Quillaja saponaria), both native desert plants, are major commercial sources of saponin extracts. Yucca schidigera is native to the southwestern United States and to the arid Mexican desert, and Quillaja saponaria is found in arid areas of Chile. Saponins have detergent or surfactant properties with both water-soluble and fat-soluble components.The use of natural saponins from yucca and soapbark as an additive in the diet, has improved production in aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of inclusion of Nutrafito plus (NTF+), which is a mixture of Yucca and Soapbark extracts, on growth, survival, and development of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and the effect on growth, survival, development, and digestive enzyme activities for juvenile Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.The extracts were included at different levels in the diets of tilapia and shrimp in four experiments. In experiment 1, at the end of 6 weeks there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between growth rates of tilapia fed 6 different diets, with no mortality nor abnormal behavior in any of the treatments. Water quality parameters were determined weekly and remained within recommended limits for Nile tilapia culture.In the second trial, at the end of 40 days, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between growth rates of fish fed 7 different diets with various levels of Nutrafito. There were no mortalities during the experiment.In the third trial, 20 tanks (140 L each) were stocked with 10 shrimp each. Tanks were divided into 5 treatments with 4 replicates each. There was significant difference (p < 0.05) between growth rates of shrimp fed 5 different diets, with higher growth rate at higher levels of inclusion.In the fourth trial, 15 tanks (140 L each) were stocked with 10 shrimp each. Tanks were divided into 5 treatments with 3 replicates each. There was significant difference between growth rates and feed conversion ratio of shrimp fed 5 different diets. In addition, an analysis for digestive enzymes activity was done and no significant difference (p > 0.05) was found between treatments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectenzymesen_US
dc.subjectextracten_US
dc.subjectgrowthen_US
dc.subjectSaponinsen_US
dc.subjectShrimpen_US
dc.subjectTilapiaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFitzsimmons, Kevin M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairFitzsimmons, Kevin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlenn, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Stephen N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatter, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10446en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752077en_US
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