Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196047
Title:
Assessing drought vulnerability
Author:
Abraham, Joseph
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation makes valuable contributions to hazard and disaster vulnerability assessment theory and methodology. Appendix A presents results of a national survey of state drought planning processes that examined and evaluated how state processes were assessing drought impacts and vulnerabilities, and how assessments were used to mitigate risk. While impact and vulnerability assessments have been useful for reactive, short-term mitigation, most were found to have not been used to develop pro-active and/or committed, long-term mitigation programs. To be useful for developing long-term planning and mitigation, assessments must involve more social scientists, a greater emphasis on second-, third-, etc., order impacts, and examining how systems are sensitive to drought exposure, and studying adaptive capacity. Appendix B adapts a political economy/human ecology and political ecology research framework and examines how regional historical, institutional and regional development patterns in central Arizona have contributed to the production of local drought vulnerability in rural Arizona during the 20th century. The study evaluates the applicability of a research framework developed in Third World settings, and resulted in valuable insights for developing state and county policy in Arizona to mitigate social, economic, and political-institutional drivers of drought vulnerability. Appendix C compliments the assessment in Appendix B by examining local drivers of drought vulnerability and conducting a comparative drought vulnerability analysis in two rural communities in northern Gila County, Arizona. The assessment found local differences in community water system vulnerabilities were driven by differences in capacity to adapt to climate variability and population growth. Differences in adaptive capacity, in turn, were driven by differences in local management, institutional factors, and economic incentives of private and public water systems. Together, the three appendices contribute practical and theoretical contributions for assessments conducted by state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and academic research units that seek to assess and ultimately mitigate hazard and disaster vulnerability.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Drought; Vulnerability; Assessment; Adaptation; Arizona; Planning
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Comrie, Andrew J.
Committee Chair:
Comrie, Andrew J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAssessing drought vulnerabilityen_US
dc.creatorAbraham, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbraham, Josephen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation makes valuable contributions to hazard and disaster vulnerability assessment theory and methodology. Appendix A presents results of a national survey of state drought planning processes that examined and evaluated how state processes were assessing drought impacts and vulnerabilities, and how assessments were used to mitigate risk. While impact and vulnerability assessments have been useful for reactive, short-term mitigation, most were found to have not been used to develop pro-active and/or committed, long-term mitigation programs. To be useful for developing long-term planning and mitigation, assessments must involve more social scientists, a greater emphasis on second-, third-, etc., order impacts, and examining how systems are sensitive to drought exposure, and studying adaptive capacity. Appendix B adapts a political economy/human ecology and political ecology research framework and examines how regional historical, institutional and regional development patterns in central Arizona have contributed to the production of local drought vulnerability in rural Arizona during the 20th century. The study evaluates the applicability of a research framework developed in Third World settings, and resulted in valuable insights for developing state and county policy in Arizona to mitigate social, economic, and political-institutional drivers of drought vulnerability. Appendix C compliments the assessment in Appendix B by examining local drivers of drought vulnerability and conducting a comparative drought vulnerability analysis in two rural communities in northern Gila County, Arizona. The assessment found local differences in community water system vulnerabilities were driven by differences in capacity to adapt to climate variability and population growth. Differences in adaptive capacity, in turn, were driven by differences in local management, institutional factors, and economic incentives of private and public water systems. Together, the three appendices contribute practical and theoretical contributions for assessments conducted by state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and academic research units that seek to assess and ultimately mitigate hazard and disaster vulnerability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDroughten_US
dc.subjectVulnerabilityen_US
dc.subjectAssessmenten_US
dc.subjectAdaptationen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlanningen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorComrie, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairComrie, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberComrie, Andrew J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBatterbury, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYool, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorehouse, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristopherson, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1948en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746575en_US
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