Directly Measuring the Adhesive and Elastic Properties of Bacteria using a Surface Force Apparatus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196035
Title:
Directly Measuring the Adhesive and Elastic Properties of Bacteria using a Surface Force Apparatus
Author:
Heo, Cheol Ho
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Bacterial adhesion is the first step of biofilm formation that plays various roles in the environment and the human body. Examples of undesirable roles of biofilm formation include metal rust, sewage sludge and bacteria-related diseases. Desirable roles are biofiltration and bioremediation.For a decade, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been the primary tool used to study the adhesion and elastic properties of individual bacteria. In this work we show it is possible to use a Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) to measure elastic and adhesive properties of small collections of surface bound bacteria. The measurements are conducted with incomplete, patterned bacterial films and we have developed a protocol to image the contact area with AFM after the experiment. Using the SFA, we measured the force profile between a P. Aeruginosa PAO1 film and a bare mica surface. We repeated the measurement in the same contact position for up to ten days to determine the effect of desiccation on the film material properties, and then moved to the new contact area to measure the film thickness and elastic properties. A large shrinkage of the bacterial film thickness was measured during the first few days due to the bacterial film desiccation and rearrangement. The proportion of shrinkage depends on factors such as the bacterial film coverage, roughness, temperature and relative humidity. Thickness compressibility was estimated from the force curves. As a force approximation, the stress at the center of the contact (σ) and the area of the contact were estimated by applying the Hertz model. Since the film is incomplete the calculated area in contact was reduced by a factor estimated from the optical image of the contact zone. Adhesiveness was measured in receding force profiles. Maximum adhesive force was detected in the first day, due to the high capillary force, decreased by the bacterial film desiccation and increased again due to the conditioning film.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
surface force apparatus; SFA; Multiple Beam Interferometry; bacteria; adhesion; compression
Degree Name:
PhD
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Curry, Joan E.
Committee Chair:
Curry, Joan E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDirectly Measuring the Adhesive and Elastic Properties of Bacteria using a Surface Force Apparatusen_US
dc.creatorHeo, Cheol Hoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeo, Cheol Hoen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBacterial adhesion is the first step of biofilm formation that plays various roles in the environment and the human body. Examples of undesirable roles of biofilm formation include metal rust, sewage sludge and bacteria-related diseases. Desirable roles are biofiltration and bioremediation.For a decade, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been the primary tool used to study the adhesion and elastic properties of individual bacteria. In this work we show it is possible to use a Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) to measure elastic and adhesive properties of small collections of surface bound bacteria. The measurements are conducted with incomplete, patterned bacterial films and we have developed a protocol to image the contact area with AFM after the experiment. Using the SFA, we measured the force profile between a P. Aeruginosa PAO1 film and a bare mica surface. We repeated the measurement in the same contact position for up to ten days to determine the effect of desiccation on the film material properties, and then moved to the new contact area to measure the film thickness and elastic properties. A large shrinkage of the bacterial film thickness was measured during the first few days due to the bacterial film desiccation and rearrangement. The proportion of shrinkage depends on factors such as the bacterial film coverage, roughness, temperature and relative humidity. Thickness compressibility was estimated from the force curves. As a force approximation, the stress at the center of the contact (σ) and the area of the contact were estimated by applying the Hertz model. Since the film is incomplete the calculated area in contact was reduced by a factor estimated from the optical image of the contact zone. Adhesiveness was measured in receding force profiles. Maximum adhesive force was detected in the first day, due to the high capillary force, decreased by the bacterial film desiccation and increased again due to the conditioning film.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectsurface force apparatusen_US
dc.subjectSFAen_US
dc.subjectMultiple Beam Interferometryen_US
dc.subjectbacteriaen_US
dc.subjectadhesionen_US
dc.subjectcompressionen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCurry, Joan E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairCurry, Joan E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChorover, Jonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaier, Raina M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1852en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746401en_US
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