Progressive Aphasia: Patterns of Language Behavior and Regional Cortical Atrophy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/196034
Title:
Progressive Aphasia: Patterns of Language Behavior and Regional Cortical Atrophy
Author:
Henry, Maya
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Primary Progressive aphasia (PPA) is a disorder characterized by gradual decline in language functions, with relative sparing of other cognitive abilities. This behavioral profile results from neurodegenerative disease that preferentially affects language cortex. As is the case in aphasia resulting from stroke, any of several critical language processing domains may be affected in PPA, including syntax, semantics, phonology, and orthography. In stroke-induced aphasia, traditional lesion mapping approaches have provided important insight into the localization of cortical regions supporting these domains. Specifically, left perisylvian cortex has been implicated in syntactic and phonological aspects of language, whereas left extrasylvian cortical regions are associated with lexical-semantic and orthographic functions. The goal of the present study was to seek converging evidence for the role of left hemisphere cortical regions in language using a voxel-based imaging technique in individuals with PPA. Fifteen individuals with progressive aphasia and fifteen normal controls were given a comprehensive language battery comprising tasks in the domains of syntax, semantics, phonology, and orthography. A subset of patients and all normal controls underwent high-resolution structural MRI scanning. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to characterize patterns of regional cortical atrophy in the patients relative to controls and to correlate language tasks with gray matter volumes. Results confirm a key role for left perisylvian cortex in phonological and syntactic processes, and indicate that left temporal regions are critically involved in semantic processes. Findings shed light on the veracity of the "primary systems" hypothesis of written language, which posits that written language impairments arise from core cognitive deficits affecting semantic and phonological systems.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
aphasia; dementia; language; progressive aphasia; voxel-based morphometry
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beeson, Pelagie M.
Committee Chair:
Beeson, Pelagie M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProgressive Aphasia: Patterns of Language Behavior and Regional Cortical Atrophyen_US
dc.creatorHenry, Mayaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Mayaen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrimary Progressive aphasia (PPA) is a disorder characterized by gradual decline in language functions, with relative sparing of other cognitive abilities. This behavioral profile results from neurodegenerative disease that preferentially affects language cortex. As is the case in aphasia resulting from stroke, any of several critical language processing domains may be affected in PPA, including syntax, semantics, phonology, and orthography. In stroke-induced aphasia, traditional lesion mapping approaches have provided important insight into the localization of cortical regions supporting these domains. Specifically, left perisylvian cortex has been implicated in syntactic and phonological aspects of language, whereas left extrasylvian cortical regions are associated with lexical-semantic and orthographic functions. The goal of the present study was to seek converging evidence for the role of left hemisphere cortical regions in language using a voxel-based imaging technique in individuals with PPA. Fifteen individuals with progressive aphasia and fifteen normal controls were given a comprehensive language battery comprising tasks in the domains of syntax, semantics, phonology, and orthography. A subset of patients and all normal controls underwent high-resolution structural MRI scanning. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to characterize patterns of regional cortical atrophy in the patients relative to controls and to correlate language tasks with gray matter volumes. Results confirm a key role for left perisylvian cortex in phonological and syntactic processes, and indicate that left temporal regions are critically involved in semantic processes. Findings shed light on the veracity of the "primary systems" hypothesis of written language, which posits that written language impairments arise from core cognitive deficits affecting semantic and phonological systems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaphasiaen_US
dc.subjectdementiaen_US
dc.subjectlanguageen_US
dc.subjectprogressive aphasiaen_US
dc.subjectvoxel-based morphometryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pelagie M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBeeson, Pelagie M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRapcsak, Steven Z.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlexander, Gene E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10365en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659751982en_US
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